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hypoventilation (end-tidal carbon dioxide, 57 mm Hg), intermittent positive pressure ventilation was initiated. The CT revealed a persistent right aortic arch with secondary esophageal constriction via the ligamentum arteriosum, an aberrant left subclavian artery

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Persistent right aortic arch is the most common vascular ring anomaly in dogs. 1 In the normal embryologic development of dogs, the aortic arch develops from the left fourth aortic arch and left dorsal aorta. In addition, a fetal vessel, known as

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To evaluate long-term outcome of dogs with persistent right aortic arch that undergo surgical correction.

Design—

Retrospective study.

Animals—

25 dogs.

Procedure—

Surgical correction consisted of ligation and division of the ligamentum arteriosum through a left fourth intercostal thoracotomy. Long-term (> 6 months after surgery) follow-up Information was obtained by means of a telephone survey of owners (22 dogs) and by means of reevaluati0ns by a veterinarian (3).

Results—

Median age at the time of surgical treatment was 12 weeks. Short-term (2 to 4 weeks after surgery) follow-up information was available for 14 dogs. Nine no longer regurgitated after eating, and 5 regurgitated infrequently. Follow-up esophagography (median time after surgery, 4 months) waS performed in 13 dogs and revealed persistence of megaesophagus in all 13. At the time of long-term follow-up, 23 (92%) dogs no longer regurgitated after eating, and the remaining 2(8%) had regurgitated less than once per week.

Clinical Implications—

Contrary to previous reports, surgical correction of persistent right aortic arch resulted in complete alleviation of clinical signs in most dogs and an improvement in signs in the remaining dogs. Persistence of megaesophagus and regurgitation in the early postoperative period did not indicate a poor long-term outcome. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:1761–1763)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

arch in a foal . Vet Surg 1986 ; 15 : 325 – 328 . 10.1111/j.1532-950X.1986.tb00236.x 6. Butt TD MacDonald DG Crawford WH , et al . Persistent right aortic arch in a yearling horse . Can Vet J 1998 ; 39 : 714 – 715 . 7. Rooney JR II

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, likely secondary to aspiration. A congenital vascular ring anomaly was considered probable, with persistent right aortic arch being most likely. Figure 3— A lateral positive-contrast esophagram of the same pony colt as in Figure 1 . The esophagus

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

included vascular ring anomaly such as persistent right aortic arch, retroesophageal left subclavian artery, and double aortic arch; acquired or congenital esophageal strictures; extraluminal mass; or esophageal neoplasia. Figure 2— Same radiographic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

results in the classic clinical manifestation of postprandial regurgitation of solid foods by young dogs soon after weaning. 4,5 A commonly quoted statistic is that 95% of vascular ring anomalies are composed of a “persistent right aortic arch with a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

437 Thoracoscopy versus thoracotomy for surgical correction of persistent right aortic arch in dogs Thoracoscopy was found to be an acceptable method for treating dogs with persistent right aortic arch, compared with thoracotomy, in a study

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association