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Introduction Bile peritonitis refers to peritoneal inflammation in response to free bile within the peritoneal cavity. In dogs, the most common sources of bile peritonitis are ruptured gallbladder mucoceles, necrotizing cholecystitis, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Causes of peritonitis are numerous and include infectious agents, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, as well as noninfectious agents. Categorization of bacterial peritonitis into primary, secondary, and tertiary forms is regular practice in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

important being leakage of ingesta at the surgical site resulting in postoperative septic peritonitis. Factors associated with leakage or survival following gastrointestinal surgery in dogs have been reported. 1–4 Dogs and cats undergoing multiple

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Male gender, older age, and emergency surgical conditions have also been identified as risk factors for AKI in human beings. 16 Septic peritonitis is a common and often fatal problem in dogs. This condition requires emergency surgical intervention and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Peritonitis was diagnosed in 67 horses between 1985 and 1990: 14 horses developed septic peritonitis after intestinal rupture, 25 horses developed peritonitis after abdominal surgery, and 28 horses had peritonitis not associated with intestinal rupture or abdominal surgery. Forty of 67 horses (59.7%) did not survive. Nonsurvivors had higher heart rates (P = 0.01), RBC count (P = 0.039), serum creatinine concentration (P = 0.036), pcv (P = 0.007), and anion gap (P = 0.005); lower venous blood pH (P = 0.002); and a greater number of bacterial species cultured from peritoneal fluid samples (P = 0.054), compared with those from survivors. Nonsurvivors were more likely to have signs of abdominal pain (P < 0.000), circulatory shock (P = 0.009), and bacteria in peritoneal fluid samples (P = 0.042). Physical examination and peritoneal fluid analysis were the most valuable diagnostic aids for intestinal rupture. Peritonitis after abdominal surgery resulted in high mortality (56%); peritonitis not associated with intestinal rupture or abdominal surgery had lower mortality (42.9%). Clinical and laboratory indices can be of value in determining the prognosis for horses with peritonitis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Rapid and accurate diagnosis of septic peritonitis is critical to patient survival. Many diagnostic tests that evaluate peritoneal fluid samples can be used to identify septic peritonitis, including cytologic identification of intracellular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Septic peritonitis is associated with a high mortality rate, and it is a major cause of sepsis in dogs. The most common predisposing cause for septic peritonitis is the contamination of (or translocation into) the peritoneal cavity by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of this study was to obtain preliminary data that can be used to design larger prospective trials to investigate the clinical impact of delivering ampicillin-sulbactam as a CI or II to dogs with septic peritonitis. This will be accomplished by

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

septic veterinary patients. The primary objective of this preliminary study was to describe daily changes in serum HA concentration over the course of hospitalization in client-owned dogs with septic peritonitis. A secondary objective was to identify

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(19.1 × 10 3 cells/μL). The neutrophilia was attributed to the ongoing inflammatory response associated with pneumonia, fibrinous pleuritis, and peritonitis. Over the next week, the pleural and peritoneal effusions resolved, and there was evidence

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association