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system (peri-neural catheter) or a longer-acting local anesthetic. Intermittent or continuous peri-neural nerve anesthesia provided by delivery systems is not only difficult to maintain but associated with several potential complications, including

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

similar to that seen when the drug is administered perineurally. 10 However, dexmedetomidine can induce effects such as bradycardia and sedation, and these effects may be more prominent following IV rather than perineural administration. In dogs

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hydrochloride is administered perineurally to the palmar digital nerves of horses, it provides analgesia for approximately 90 minutes in animals with experimentally induced foot pain 5 and 180 minutes in animals exposed to a thermal nociceptive stimulus. 6 The

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the authors’ knowledge, the use of blind perineural injection techniques for ON or LCFN blockade by the sole use of SALMs in dogs has not been reported. In a previous study 16 in dogs, a relatively effective approach to block the SN by the use of an

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

One aspect of multimodal analgesia for orthopedic pain in horses is regional anesthesia, which includes perineural anesthesia. Perineural anesthesia is commonly performed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The analgesic effects of several

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

risks, the owner declined surgical intervention. An ultrasound-guided paravertebral perineural glucocorticoid injection was performed. Dog 1 was sedated with dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg [2.27 μg/lb], IV) and methadone (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], IV) and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Biaxial palmar digital neurectomy of all limbs was performed on 6 mixed-breed castrated adult male horses, using a standard guillotine method. Using a Teflon catheter, 20 mg (2 ml) of sodium hyaluronate (group 1), 2 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (group 2), or catheter placement with no infusion (group 3) was applied to 4 (group 1) or 2 (groups 2 and 3) of 8 incisions/horse. Treatments were administered after closure of the neurectomy incision, and the catheter was removed. Horses were evaluated daily for 1 week, then weekly over a 9- week period for evidence of lameness, swelling, and ultrasonographic changes. On week 9, horses were euthanatized and neurectomy sites were removed en bloc for histologic evaluation of axonal regrowth, inflammation, and fibrosis. Neither lameness nor sign of painful neuroma was observed clinically in any of the horses. Neurectomy eliminated cutaneous heel sensation in all limbs for the duration of the study. Swelling was evident at all neurectomy sites. There were no significant differences between treatment sites for measurement of pastern circumference or ultrasonographic evaluation of incisional swelling. Foci of ultrasonographic hyperechogenicity increased over time, but there was no significant difference in hyperechogenicity between treatment groups. Histologic evidence of neuroma formation was observed at all sites. Morphometric assessment of neuroma cross-sectional areas revealed no significant difference between the groups, as did subjective histologic assessment of neuroma density and fibrous tissue content. We conclude that there are no clinical, ultrasonographic, or histologic effects on neuroma formation and fibrosis at sites of palmar digital neurectomy associated with a single perineural administration of sodium hyaluronate or phosphate-buffered saline solution.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

an animal challenging when only slight improvement in lameness is detected. 6,7 In addition, observers may have bias 7 during assessment of improvements in lameness following perineural anesthesia. Thus, more accurate, objective methods are needed

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

following administration of perineural anesthesia. Thus, adjunct methods that are more sensitive and objective than the subjective lameness examination are necessary for detection and monitoring of horses with mild lameness and assessment of lame horses

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

following administration of perineural anesthesia. Therefore, an accurate, objective method is needed to supplement the subjective lameness examination for the detection and monitoring of horses with mild lameness as well as to assess the response of those

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research