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recent publications, the prevalence of equine TMJ problems is considered to be low. Attributing the TMJ to having any role in poor performance should, therefore, be a process of exclusion, not inclusion. Other more common problems such as lameness and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction The musculoskeletal system is a primary cause of poor performance in athletic horses, and its management is at the heart of equine medicine. 1 , 2 Within this system, the axial skeleton and more specifically the back are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The ability of horses to move and dynamically stabilize the neck and back are integral to all forms of equine locomotion, including natural gaits and sport-specific performance. Cervical dynamic mobilization exercises involve voluntary movements

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

most commonly incurred are closely associated with type of activity in which the athlete is engaged. To our knowledge, disorders and diseases of performance-age bucking bulls have not been described. The objective of the study reported here was to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

gastrointestinal diseases and other debilitating conditions. Impaired venous drainage of the head and neck, particularly when bilateral, is suspected to limit athletic performance; thus, the objective of the study reported here was to evaluate the impact of jugular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

clinical importance of presale radiographic findings in Thoroughbreds. Repository radiographic findings must be interpreted with consideration of the various breeds and athletic disciplines involved. 7 The Western performance horse industry has notably

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

% to 17% of sow removals, and old age, which has been reported to account for 9% to 24% of sow removals. 1,4–6,8,9 Productivity-associated sow removal and replacement can be considered a successful management strategy only if reproductive performance

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

compared among financial performance groups to identify differences that could potentially account for the differences in financial performance among groups. Materials and Methods Financial statements (ie, annual balance sheets and income statements

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

To our knowledge, there have been no published reports on the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems associated with lameness and poor performance in horses used in the athletic activity of cutting, which involves separating or cutting a specific

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, compared with lambs with lower immunoglobulin concentrations. 1,2 In addition, lambs that survive despite FPT reportedly grow slowly. 1,2 Nevertheless, little is known on the effects of passive transfer status on growth performance in dairy lambs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association