Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 264 items for :

  • "parvovirus" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Introduction Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) emerged in 1978, resulting in the deaths of millions of dogs worldwide. 1 High viral stability in contaminated environments makes CPV-2 an ongoing threat for susceptible canines globally. Although

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Although widespread vaccination of pet cats has made FPV infection an uncommon diagnosis at present, animal shelters continue to report large-scale outbreaks of FPV. 1–10 Feline panleukopenia virus is a highly contagious parvovirus of cats that

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral agent that spreads between dogs following oronasal exposure or fecal ingestion. 1,2 Despite the availability and widespread use of effective vaccines, CPV remains a major cause of morbidity and death

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus first emerged in the mid-1970s as an enteric pathogen of dogs 1–3 and has remained a major pathogen worldwide. The characteristic signs of CPV enteritis include hemorrhagic diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite, lethargy, fever

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

parvovirus is a Protoparvovirus that infects dogs, but may have originated from cats. The survival rate for CPV-infected dogs is < 10% when left untreated and ranges from 64% to 95% when treated. 5 Canine parvovirus is transmitted by fecal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus was first identified in dogs in the late 1970s, and was named CPV type-2 (CPV-2) to distinguish it from the minute virus of canines, another parvovirus (CPV type-1) that infects dogs. Canine parvovirus type-2 was quickly

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

within the shelter. ABBREVIATIONS CDV Canine distemper virus CI Confidence interval CPV Canine parvovirus OR Odds ratio PAT Protective antibody titer a. Animal Health Diagnostic Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The putative binding of porcine parvovirus (ppv) to semen components in vitro was examined along with the shedding pattern of ppv in oronasally infected boars. Porcine parvovirus dna was determined to be bound to spermatozoa that had been incubated in vitro with ppv and washed to remove loosely adherent virus. To determine whether ppv was shed in the semen, four 8-month-old boars, seronegative for ppv, were inoculated oronasally with a virulent strain of ppv. Prior to virus inoculation, a catheter was surgically implanted in the vas deferens for the purpose of collecting cauda epididymal semen free of extrinsic contamination. Epididymal semen specimens were collected prior to inoculation and daily thereafter for 21 days. A fifth boar was inoculated oronasally with ppv, but semen was collected by electroejaculation twice weekly for an equal period of time. Reproductive glands and semen specimens from all boars were examined by nucleic acid hybridization for the presence of viral dna. All boars seroconverted to ppv, as evidenced by serum antibody titers ranging from 512 to 8,192 hemagglutinating inhibition units/50 μl. Porcine parvovirus dna was detected in epididymal semen of 3 of 4 catheterized boars on postinoculation days 5 through 9, but not in semen obtained by electroejaculation. Viral dna was consistently detected in tissue samples collected on postinoculation days 8 and 21 from the scrotal lymph nodes (4 of 5 boars) and epididymides (3 of 5 boars).

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, canine parvovirus, and canine distemper virus as provided on the submission form. Mixed-breed dogs and 73 unique pure breeds were included. Mixed-breed dogs made up 22% of the samples. Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever samples made up 12% and 10

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

shelter. ABBREVIATIONS CDV Canine distemper virus CPV Canine parvovirus HI Hemagglutination inhibition IFA Immunofluorescence assay NPV Negative predictive value PAT Protective antibody titer PPV Positive predictive value VN Virus

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association