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in the management of malignant oral tumors. 2 For accurate diagnosis, determination of prognosis, and planning of treatment for dogs with oral neoplasms, it is essential to obtain a complete medical history and perform general physical and oral

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

oral tumors in 69 dogs. In another study 8 involving caudal maxillectomy in 20 dogs, 6 (30%) dogs required an intraoperative transfusion, 11 (55%) developed severe hypotension from intraoperative blood loss, and 4 (20%) had blood loss without

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

S creening diagnostics are used to detect metastasis as well as other diseases that may affect the prognosis or treatment plan. In veterinary medicine, there are no published consensus guidelines for screening oral tumors, 1 , 2 such as those

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

S taging is an essential step in the work-up of oral tumors. Evidence of locoregional or distant metastasis informs prognosis and invariably influences the recommended care paradigm. However, in veterinary medicine, there is no standard guideline

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

which oral tumors of possible odontogenic origin were diagnosed during a 10-year period (1995 to 2005). Keywords used to identify cases were epulis, odontogenic, ameloblastoma, and odontoma. Dogs were included in the study if they had complete medical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

survival time for ≥ 6 months, unless tumor progression or patient death occurred sooner. Dogs with oral tumors, hemangiosarcoma, or histiocytic sarcoma were excluded from the study because, compared with other STSs, oral STSs tend to be more aggressive and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

expression (20/20 individuals) and often COX-2 (35/45 individuals) expression are up-regulated in oral SCCs. Immunohistochemical analysis of oral SCCs in cats has revealed immunoreactivity to COX-2 in approximately 28 of 34 (82%) oral tumors 7 ; in another

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

out the presence of malignancy. That study 3 also found that displacement of teeth was common in dogs with malignant oral tumors. However, this finding is not limited to malignant tumors as evidenced by the dog of this report and radiographic examples

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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skeletal osteosarcoma, canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma, fibrosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, amelanotic malignant melanoma, other oral tumors, and severe localized osteomyelitis. Given the clinical appearance of the mass and its location in the rostral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

partial maxillectomy for the treatment of oral tumors in dogs In a review of records for 193 dogs that underwent maxillectomy for oral tumor excision, the most common intraoperative complication was excessive surgical bleeding (103/193 [53.4%]), for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association