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pathologists do not have access to indirect and direct immunofluorescence, which hampers their ability to make an autoimmune diagnosis in some cases. Immunodiagnostics for veterinary oral medicine cases is on the near horizon. 46 Photographic representation of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to characterize the clinical and histopathologic features of oral eosinophilic lesions in cats.

Animals

38 client-owned cats.

METHODS

The medical records database was searched for cats diagnosed with histologically confirmed eosinophilic oral lesions from 1997 to 2022. Information such as medical history, lifestyle factors, clinical presentation, and radiographic and histopathologic features was included for 38 client-owned cats. Response to treatment and long-term follow-up was also recorded.

RESULTS

The most affected site was the tongue, with approximately half of the affected cats showing signs of oral discomfort and difficulty eating or breathing. Ulcerative lesions were common, with two-thirds of patients showing more than 1 site affected. Histological samples had a classic appearance, whereas some had an atypical appearance characterized by degenerate collagen clusters associated with multinucleated giant cells. A significant association between lesion location, clinical signs, and prognosis was also found, with patients with palatal lesions being more likely to show respiratory signs and less likely to respond to treatment. Finally, treatment response was observed in most cases within 2 months of commencing therapy combining antimicrobial, and immunosuppressive treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The results of this study demonstrate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of cases of oral eosinophilic lesions in cats. Additionally, it emphasizes the need for a multimodal approach to treatment which should include antibacterial therapy. Of no less importance is that other systems may be affected in these patients, warranting a multidisciplinary approach to their management.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum total antioxidant capacities (TACs) correlate with the degree of severity of periodontal disease in dogs.

Animals—41 Toy and Miniature Poodles.

Procedure—After assessment of the degree of severity of naturally occurring periodontitis, GCF samples from both maxillary fourth premolars and a blood sample were collected from each dog. The condition of the periodontium of the entire dentition and at each site of GCF collection was recorded. Clinical parameters assessed included plaque index, gingival index, and probing depth. Radiographic analysis of alveolar bone level was also performed. Total antioxidant capacity was measured in GCF and serum samples by use of a commercial kit.

Results—Dogs with gingivitis and minimal periodontitis had significantly higher TAC in GCF than dogs with advanced periodontitis. Bivariate regression analysis revealed significant negative correlations between TAC in GCF and clinical parameters and age. The TAC in serum was significantly negatively correlated with the degree of gingival inflammation but was not significantly correlated with age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—TAC in GCF is related to the degree of severity of periodontal disease in dogs. This is likely the result of release of reactive oxygen species by activated phagocytes and fibroblasts in the inflamed periodontal tissues. The results of our study suggest that the local delivery of antioxidants may be a useful adjunctive treatment for periodontitis in dogs. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1584–1588)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Immune-mediated and autoimmune diseases of the skin often present with oral cavity involvement. Autoimmune subepidermal blistering diseases and pemphigus vulgaris are classic examples. While the primary lesions (vesicles and bullae) are relatively specific, these fragile lesions evolve rapidly into erosions and ulcers, which are lesion types that overlap with many diseases. Furthermore, some immune-mediated diseases such as severe adverse drug reactions, lupus diseases, canine uveodermatological syndrome, and vasculitis, may or may not involve the oral cavity, and often nonoral clinical manifestations are more diagnostic. In these situations, disease knowledge combined with signalment, lesion distribution, and history help to narrow the differentials. Surgical biopsy is required for confirmation in most diseases, while immunosuppressive treatments most typically involve glucocorticoids with or without nonsteroidal immunosuppressants.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, Mahar A. Non-odontogenic bone pathology . In: Farah C , Balasubramaniam R , McCullough M , eds. Contemporary Oral Medicine . Springer ; 2018 . 4. Nomura K , Sato K. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst in a dog . J Vet Med Sci . 1997

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cases. Jekl et al 6 report on the surgical treatment regimen and associated outcome of odontogenic abscess and osteomyelitis in 200 rabbits . Shifting from a surgical to oral medicine focus, a narrative review and decision tree on the classification

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

successful outcomes. Oral Medicine Identify the patterns of oral inflammation, including pericoronitis, caudal mucosal, palatoglossal, esophagitis, cheilitis, glossitis, palatitis, contact, and generalized. Consider differential diagnosis of feline

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, Eversole L , Truelove E , eds. Essentials of oral medicine . London : BC Booker , 2001 ; 277 – 288 . 18. Ackerman BH , Kasbekar N . Disturbances of taste and smell induced by drugs . Pharmacotherapy 1997 ; 17 : 482 – 496 . 10.1002/j

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

.1055/s-0038-1633078 54. Tholen M , Hoyt RF . Oral pathology . In: Bojrab MJ , Tholen M , eds. Small animal oral medicine and surgery . Philadelphia : Lea and Febiger , 1990 ; 25 – 55 . 55. Liptak JM , Dernell WS , Ehrhart N

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association