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History A 3-year-old neutered male hound-mix dog was presented for treatment of ongoing pruritic ears. The patient had a history of allergies and was on oclacitinib (Apoquel), 0.5 mg/kg once daily PO, and a hydrolyzed protein diet (z/d; Hill

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Oclacitinib was approved in the United States in 2013 for the control of pruritus associated with allergic dermatitis and control of atopic dermatitis (AD) in dogs at least 12 months of age. Oclacitinib represented the first Janus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine allergic dermatitis is a common chronic skin disease of companion animals, 1 and effective treatments include orally administered glucocorticoids, cyclosporine, and oclacitinib and subcutaneously administered ASIT and lokivetmab. 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

is associated with multiple adverse effects because glucocorticoid receptors are present in almost all cells. More recently, drugs such as cyclosporin A b and oclacitinib c and a caninized (ie, genetically modified to be tolerated by the targeted

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

new treatment options. It has now been 10 years since the launch of oclacitinib in the US, and it is timely to provide an evidence-based review of what has been published on oclacitinib, what we have learned using this medication, and where we go from

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

severity of clinical signs these allergic dogs experience can balance that risk. Happily, over the past decade, cyclosporine has been associated with good benefit-risk ratios, 2,3 and long-term use of oclacitinib is considered safe and effective as well. 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, oclacitinib), with azathioprine being the most frequently reported. 4 , 5 Information about nonsteroidal immunosuppressants in feline PV is limited. Table 3 General principles of immunosuppression and most commonly used immunosuppressants in dogs and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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immunotherapy is an increase in pruritus with the injections of allergen extract, 17 which will typically lead to a decrease in extract volume and/or a premedication with for example antihistamines, glucocorticoids, or oclacitinib shortly before the injection

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with either oclacitinib or, more recently, prednisolone (0.4 to 0.6 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) prescribed by the referring veterinarian. During flare-ups in which secondary bacterial infection was considered a feature, adjunctive antimicrobial treatment

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

). Questionnaire From the questionnaire, 7 (35%) CKCS had at least 1 abnormality (2 had 1, 1 had 2, 3 had 3, and 1 had 4) identified. Five CKCS were scratching their neck (mild; 2 only with their collar on, 1 resolved with oclacitinib), 3 had previous ear

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research