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veterinary staff have an elevated risk due to occupational exposure. In 2021, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated that around 312,000 people were working in an animal-care setting as veterinarians, as veterinary technologists and technicians, and as

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Exposures to occupational hazards in the clinical veterinary medical setting are common. Surveys 1–7 have revealed that 50% to 67% of veterinarians and 98% of veterinary technicians experience an animal-related injury at some point in their

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

study used either new definitions or variations and permutations of the existing nomenclature associated with occupational stress. Subsequently in 1995, Charles Figley 3 described compassion fatigue as equivalent to secondary traumatic stress and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

veterinary services for cattle, horses, swine, goats, and sheep) face additional challenges that might increase their risk of occupational exposure to zoonotic diseases. These challenges arise through working primarily in the field, which prevents the use of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To estimate absolute and relative risks of preterm delivery (PTD) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) births among a cohort of female veterinarians in relation to selected occupational factors, including clinical practice type (CPT).

Design

Retrospective cohort survey.

Sample Population

2,997 female graduates from US veterinary colleges between 1970 and 1980.

Procedure

Relevant health and occupational data were collected through a self-administered mail questionnaire with telephone follow-up of nonrespondents. Absolute and relative risks of PTD and SGA births were estimated in relation to maternal CPT at the time of conception and exposure to 13 occupational factors. Attempts were made to control confounding by use of multiple logistic regression analyses.

Results

Absolute and relative risks of PTD were highest for veterinarians employed in exclusively equine clinical practice. Although several increased, none of the CPT-specific relative risk estimates were significantly different from the null value of 1. Exposure-specific analyses indicated that occupational involvement with solvents among exclusively small animal practitioners was associated with the highest relative risk of PTD. A small number of SGA births limited information that could be obtained from these analyses. Overall absolute risks of PTD and SGA births among cohort members were much lower in comparison with the general female population.

Clinical Implications

Given the large number of women currently practicing and entering the profession of veterinary medicine, clinical tasks associated with potential reproductive hazards should be approached with heightened awareness and increased caution, especially activities that may involve exposure to solvents. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:61-67)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was developed to ensure that every American has a safe and healthy work environment. An important component of OSHA's mission is to develop and promulgate minimum standards for workplace safety, and we recently published, JAVMA fan 15, 1994 through Mar 1, 1994, a series of articles giving practical suggestions for complying with current OSHA standards. However, an equally important part of OSHA's mission is inspection of American workplaces to determine whether those workplaces are complying with safety standards. Few veterinarians know what to expect during an OSHA inspection, nor understand what their rights and responsibilities are. In this article, Ms. Richard, an attorney who specializes in management labor and employment law, outlines what to expect and what to do if your practice is inspected by the OSHA.

Please remember that the information in this article is based on the author's best interpretation of current law. However, the law can change, and the accuracy of any interpretation of the law can be challenged by the OSHA. Therefore, information in this article is intended to be only a guideline and is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal advice. Veterinarians are advised to consult with their own attorneys for advice on specific matters. Finally, this information is based on current federal OSHA guidelines. Veterinary practices located in one of the 25 states and territories with OSHA-approved state plans may have to comply with slightly different guidelines.—Kurt J. Matushek, Assistant Editor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

undefined risks to fertility as well as to an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. Comprehensive guidance to prevent or mitigate exposures to occupational reproductive health hazards for female veterinary personnel is greatly needed. 13 In recognition of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-disciplinary sectors with the tools and approaches required to drive policy and systems change. A systems approach recognizes no single variable in the veterinary profession is to blame for occupational distress, and that it takes multiple levers for change to redesign

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Major concerns in the demand and supply of veterinarians for food supply veterinary medicine (FSVM) involve job satisfaction, changes in occupational area (ie, switching careers within veterinary medicine), and commitment to a career in FSVM. To

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In the article “A systematic review of the effects of euthanasia and occupational stress in personnel working with animals in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities” (Scotney RL, McLaughlin D, Keates HL. J Am Vet

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association