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Introduction A fecalith is a firm, ovoid accumulation of ingesta or matted plant material (phytoconglobate) that can cause intraluminal obstruction of the ascending, transverse, or descending colon in equids. 1 Fecalith obstruction often

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of abdominal pain, and vocalization. Urethral obstruction is a complication of FLUTD that can lead to postrenal azotemia and severe metabolic abnormalities. 4–6 Hyperkalemia is the most life-threatening derangement, resulting in altered cardiac

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

70% of animals for which follow-up information was available were alive with no recurrence of urinary obstruction at least 1 month after discharge. 7 , 10 In another report 6 of small ruminants, 76% had normal urination by the time of discharge

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Gastrointestinal obstruction is one of the primary differential diagnoses for vomiting dogs. 1,2 Plain radiography is a readily available screening test for the presence of mechanical obstruction. Radiographic features suggestive of mechanical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

often sporadic, urolithiasis can have a significant economic and production impact on livestock, show animals, and pets worldwide. Obstruction in small ruminants typically occurs in the urethra of intact and castrated males, more specifically at the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Intestinal obstruction in cattle is a life-threatening condition that can be classified into 3 categories. The first category is physical obstruction of the intestinal lumen with infarction of the affected segment. This category includes some of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tumor, with dysuria developing in as many as 84% of affected dogs. Approximately 10% of dogs with TCC develop complete urinary tract obstruction secondary to tumor progression, and the cause of death is related to the local effects of the primary tumor

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Ureteral obstruction in cats is an increasingly recognized problem in clinical practice. The first case series 1 of cats with ureteroliths was published in 1998. Since then, the apparent prevalence of the condition has escalated because of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of systemic chemotherapy and NSAIDs. Results of a 2003 investigation 4 revealed that dogs that had TCC treated with mitoxantrone and piroxicam had a median survival time of 350 days. Ureteral or urethral obstruction (or both) frequently develops in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Feline urethral obstructions (UOs) are a common presenting reason for visits to the veterinary emergency room. Urethral obstructions may lead to clinically important life-threatening metabolic disturbances including hyperkalemia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association