Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 68 items for :

  • "noninvasive blood pressure" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide a video tutorial detailing how to perform continuous noninvasive blood pressure monitoring in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

Any size dog or cat.

METHODS

To measure blood pressure noninvasively, a blood pressure cuff is selected on the basis of the circumference of the limb and placed at the level of the right atrium. For oscillometric blood pressure measurement, the cuff is connected to an oscillometric unit that will automatically inflate and deflate the cuff in order to measure the patient’s blood pressure using an internal algorithm. For Doppler blood pressure measurement, a sphygmomanometer is used to manually inflate the pressure cuff 30 to 40 mm Hg above the point where the audible arterial sounds disappear. Then, the cuff is gradually deflated until the audible arterial sounds return; the pressure at the first sound is recorded as the blood pressure. To generate continuous readings, the oscillometric machine is set to measure blood pressure as often as every minute. Alternatively, the Doppler crystal is taped to the patient’s leg to facilitate repeated cuff inflation/deflation and collection of blood pressure values as often as every minute.

RESULTS

Continuous blood pressure readings can be obtained by both the oscillometric and Doppler techniques.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Continuous blood pressure readings identify trends in a patient’s cardiovascular status. The most reliable oscillometric blood pressure reading is the mean arterial pressure. Doppler blood pressure values are considered systolic in dogs. Doppler values in cats underestimate systolic and overestimate mean blood pressure.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-dependent factors (eg, darkly pigmented skin). Figure 1 Placement of noninvasive blood pressure measurement devices on the tail of an anesthetized dog in dorsal recumbency. A—A flow-occluding cuff (cuff width approximately 40% of tail circumference) is placed

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

arterial blood pressure NIBP Noninvasive blood pressure SAP Systolic arterial blood pressure Footnotes a. BM7Vet Pro, Bionet Co Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea. b. Optiva, Smith Medical, Minneapolis, Minn. c. UniMed Medical Supplies

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

arrhythmias through pulse deficits or variable pulse strengths. Traditionally, the graphical representation of an animal's pulse required an invasive arterial line. However, contemporary advancements in noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitoring technology

Open access

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Agreement of systolic blood pressure measurements (SBP) between noninvasive blood pressure devices in conscious dogs is poorly studied. Situational hypertension is expected in clinics, but studies are lacking. This study aimed to compare SBP measurements obtained with Doppler ultrasonic flow detector (Doppler) versus high-definition oscillometry (HDO) in clinics and at home and to estimate the prevalence of situational hypertension in conscious, apparently healthy elderly dogs.

ANIMALS

122 apparently healthy elderly or geriatric dogs were prospectively recruited.

PROCEDURES

Systolic blood pressure was obtained consecutively with Doppler and HDO techniques in a randomized order per dog, following a standardized protocol. An at-home measurement was advised for in-clinic hypertensive dogs (SBP ≥ 160 mmHg), also using both devices.

RESULTS

Dual measurements were available in 102 dogs. Median SBP was 147.3 mmHg (range, 105 to 239 mmHg) for Doppler and 152.3 mmHg (range, 113 to 221 mmHg) for HDO. Forty-six percent (56/122) were hypertensive, of which 9% (11/122) were hypertensive with both methods. No significant difference was found between the 2 devices in the global study population or within the group of hypertensive dogs. Repeated at-home measurements were performed in 20/56 (35.7%) hypertensive dogs, resulting in a 10 and 26 mmHg lower median SBP value for Doppler and HDO, respectively (P > .05). In-clinic situational hypertension was presumed in 8/20 (40%) dogs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The choice of the noninvasive blood pressure device did not significantly impact SBP results, but large interindividual differences in SBP between techniques occurred. Situational hypertension was frequently observed in clinic.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

measurement. Some of these studies yielded conflicting results. For example, investigators of 1 study 5 found that noninvasive blood pressure measurements obtained from a forelimb or hind limb of normotensive patients had poor agreement and underestimated

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

considered far more likely than alternative differential diagnoses. Vascular disease was considered possible but unlikely because of the dog's progressive signs. The initial diagnostic plan included a CBC, serum biochemical analysis, and noninvasive blood

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

included evaluation of ocular reflexes and jaw tone; measurement of esophageal temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate, Sp o 2 , and P etco 2 ; oscillometric noninvasive blood pressure measurement; and ECG. c Anesthesia during the surgical procedure was

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure monitoring were instituted. Ventricular bigeminy was noted, with a right bundle branch block morphology and a ventricular rate of 80 beats/min ( Figure 1 ) . Noninvasive blood pressure was also normal, with an average

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymphopenia (0.95 X 10 9 cells/L; reference range, 1 to 4.8 X 10 9 cells/L). The rest of the findings were unremarkable. Noninvasive blood pressure measurements were within reference limits. Brain MRI findings (images not provided) were consistent with a 6

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association