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Peripheral neuropathy is an uncommon cause of forelimb lameness in horses. 1 This condition can involve the nerve roots of the brachial plexus, the brachial plexus itself, or nerves arising from it. The ventral roots from the sixth to the eighth

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

potentials, which were interpreted as evidence of a mild degree of reinnervation. Electromyographic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of suprascapular neuropathy, and suprascapular nerve decompression was recommended. Figure 2— Representative

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

involvement. Table 1— Results of electrophysiologic testing in a cat with polyneuropathy and clinical signs of bilateral brachial plexus neuropathy. Variable Tibial nerve Peroneal nerve Radial nerve Ulnar nerve

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ILP shares many pathophysiologic, histopathologic, and clinical features with inherited peripheral neuropathies seen in humans, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 and distal hereditary motor neuropathy, making it a promising spontaneous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Surgical Summit, Seattle, October 2016. ABBREVIATIONS CI Confidence interval IQR Interquartile (25th to 75th percentile) range PI Performance index RLN Recurrent laryngeal neuropathy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-sided laryngoplasty with ipsilateral ventriculocordectomy combined with corniculectomy LRQ Left-to-right angle quotient PA Partial arytenoidectomy RLN Recurrent laryngeal neuropathy Footnotes a. Model P55D, Validyne Engineering, Northridge, Calif. b

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare racing performance before and after prosthetic laryngoplasty for treatment of laryngeal neuropathy in inexperienced and experienced Thoroughbred racehorses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—52 Thoroughbred racehorses treated with prosthetic laryngoplasty for laryngeal neuropathy.

Procedure—Lifetime race records were analyzed by use of a verified regression model. Individual race records and hospital records were also reviewed.

Results—Experienced horses had a decline in performance, as measured by performance index, earnings percentage, and mean prediction error, during the 6-month period before prosthetic laryngoplasty. Performance improved after surgery, relative to performance in 1 to 4 races immediately before surgery, but did not attain previous baseline values for performance index and earnings percentage, although racing speed was restored to baseline values. Factors associated with failure to attain baseline levels of performance included other racing-related injuries and disorders, major complications of surgery, and age. Individually, however, many horses had long and successful careers after surgery. Performance of inexperienced horses after surgery was at least equal to that of experienced horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In addition to warning clients of the complications associated with prosthetic laryngoplasty, it may be prudent to provide a guarded prognosis for full restoration of racing performance in older horses, unless they are especially talented and are free of other racing-related problems. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1689–1696)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

unique LH-associated inspiratory sound pattern. 13 In another study, 10 the worsening of exercise-related respiratory tract noise was the only criterion used for identification of progressive recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in 22 of 52 horses. However

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

outcome measure to predict clinical improvement in patients. Specifically, equine recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN) has been investigated with correlating measurements of the visual appearance of the larynges, such as the amount of arytenoid abduction

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association