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beginning the fifth week after surgery (0.5 mg/kg, PO, q 48 h for 7 days, then discontinued). Results of physical and neurologic examinations 5 months after surgery were normal. Nine months after surgery, the patient was reportedly doing well and had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Neurological disorders in reptiles result from infectious diseases, nutritional deficiencies, traumatic injuries, metabolic and circulatory disorders, congenital abnormalities, toxicities, and neoplasms. 1 – 8 In inland bearded

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

after 5 months. The patient was reported to be doing well at home and to have remained seizure free at a recheck examination 6 months after initial presentation. Recheck neurologic examination revealed mild proprioceptive ataxia involving all 4 limbs and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Neurological deficits, neck pain, and neck stiffness are the most common clinical abnormalities related to the equine cervical region and, therefore, the most common reasons to pursue advanced imaging of the neck. It is well

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

M eningoencephalomyelitis of unknown etiology (MUE) is one of the most common diseases treated in veterinary neurology. The term MUE refers to a variety of noninfectious, inflammatory diseases of the CNS of dogs that are generally considered

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

generalized proprioceptive ataxia. The dog eventually recovered fully, both clinically and neurologically. This case described in the present report highlighted an unusual presentation of a dog with flaccid tetraplegia and spinal shock affecting all 4 limbs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

unremarkable. On examination at the referral center, the dog was bright and alert. Physical examination findings were unremarkable. Otoscopic examination did not reveal any discharge from either external ear canal. Neurologically, the dog had a moderate head

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

material for bacterial culture and CSF collection might have resulted in rapid neurologic deterioration secondary to brain herniation. Figure 1 Midsagittal T2-weighted (A) and transverse T2-weighted (B), T1-weighted (C), and postcontrast T1-weighted

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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author's experience, exercise-induced weakness in dogs that have chronic aortic or iliac artery thrombosis is quite common. In most of the affected dogs, neurologic examination findings are apparently normal. Because the thrombus is typically chronic in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A3-year-old castrated male Golden Retriever was evaluated because of progressive vestibular ataxia and signs of cervical pain of 2 weeks’ duration following running into a tree. On initial neurologic assessment, the dog had moderate vestibular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association