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non-small cell lung carcinoma, 8 gastric carcinoma, 9,10 transitional cell carcinoma, 11 mesothelioma, 12 hepatocellular carcinoma, 13 and malignant melanoma. 14 Cyclooxygenase-2 expression has also been investigated in canine neoplasms arising

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-based, veterinary teaching hospitals in North America. Data collection began in 1964, and the VMDB currently has records for > 1 million dogs. The purpose of the study reported here was to use data from the VMDB to identify the most common cutaneous neoplasms in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were also identified. Comments AML is a rare and aggressive myeloid neoplasm where clonal myeloid progenitor cells unable to mature accumulate in bone marrow and blood due to aberrant proliferation. 1 AML is characterized by moderate to marked

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

measurements were within reference ranges. The excised mass underwent histologic examination, the findings of which were consistent with a malignant anaplastic neoplasm. Marked cellular atypia and features of malignancy were present, and the cellular origin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Studies 1,2 in humans with a variety of naturally occurring neoplasms and in laboratory animals with experimentally induced cancer have revealed that angiogenesis is crucial for the growth, progression, and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common neoplasm found in a review of case records of 21 cats with histopathologically confirmed orbital neoplasms. Other neoplasms found were lymphosarcoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant melanoma, adenocarcinoma, fibrosarcoma, chondroma, and hemangiosarcoma. Three (14%) neoplasms were primary, 15 (71%) were secondary, invading the orbit from adjacent tissues, and 3 (14%) were a manifestation of multicentric disease. The most common clinical sign was exophthalmia, followed by chronic epiphora, enophthalmia, and strabismus. Mean survival time after diagnosis was 1.9 months. Ten cats were euthanatized at the time of diagnosis because of extensive disease. Mean survival time of the other 11 cats was 4.3 months. Skull radiography was helpful in diagnosing orbital neoplasms in 8 of 11 cats that had invasion of the orbit by adjacent neoplasms.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Nonhematopoietic hepatic neoplasms (n = 25) were diagnosed in 21 cats during a 5.5-year period. Thirteen of the neoplasms were benign bile duct adenomas and 12 were malignant, 6 of which were bile duct adenocarcinomas. All cats were ≥ 10 years old, and 14 were male. Main clinical signs were anorexia and lethargy, and 15 of 21 cats had hepatomegaly. All 21 cats were feline leukemia virustest negative. Although there was a trend toward high activities of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase, neither clinical signs nor enzyme activity were specific for diagnosis of hepatic neoplasia in the cats of this study.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

—Dogs were recruited prospectively for inclusion in the study on the basis of pericardial effusion or neoplasms. This protocol was approved by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, and signed informed consent

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Sites, histologic types, and frequencies of neoplasms in immature dogs (≤6 months old) were evaluated from data collected over 25 years. The frequencies of neoplasms in immature dogs were compared with those of mature dogs (>6 months old).

Of 69 immature dogs with neoplasms, 5 had 2 primary neoplasms each, resulting in a total of 74 neoplasms. The 3 most common sites for neoplasia, in decreasing order, were the hematopoietic system, brain, and skin. Immature dogs were 10.9 times more likely to have a neoplasm located in the brain, compared with mature dogs. Immature dogs also were 3.3 times more likely to have a neoplasm associated with the hematopoietic system, compared with mature dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A study of 26 dogs (examined consecutively) with infiltrative subcutaneous neoplasms (mastocytoma, n = 11; soft tissue sarcoma, n = 13; and adenocarcinoma, n = 2) was conducted. Dogs were evaluated by physical examination, survey radiography, ultrasonography (US), and x-ray computed tomography (CT) prior to surgical excision of the tumor. The purpose of the evaluation was to accurately define gross neoplastic margins before surgical excision and to determine whether a difference could be observed between routine clinical staging (physical examination and survey radiography) and more detailed clinical staging (US and CT imaging). The clinical stage of 5 of 26 neoplasms assessed by US and of 17 of 26 neoplasms assessed by CT was determined to be more advanced because of previously undetected neoplasia, greater neoplastic size, or greater tissue invasiveness. Preoperative imaging of infiltrative subcutaneous neoplasms, using US and CT, is highly recommended to accurately determine gross neoplastic margins.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association