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Introduction Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common cardiac cause of canine morbidity and mortality, accounting for over 70% of cases, 1 , 2 with a lifetime incidence approaching 100% in some breeds. 2 Treatment of canine

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in dogs with mild myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD; grades 1 to 2) and moderate-severe MMVD (grades 3 to 4). Each data point represents a value for a single dog. Figure 5 Scatter plots showing the

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Clinical Studies Review Committee (#002.18 and #001-2022) and owners signed an informed consent form. Three groups of client-owned dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) were enrolled in the study: (1) Dogs with CHF and cardiac cachexia (CHF

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is a common cardiac disease in dogs that involves degenerative changes in the mitral valve. These degenerative changes result in mitral regurgitation, volume overload, and left

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

heart failure, such as reduced appetite, cough, and exercise intolerance. The most common cause of heart failure in dogs is myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), which accounts for approximately 75% of canine heart disease cases seen by veterinary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

acute/chronic HF and nonischemic HF. 16 , 17 In contrast, elevated Ang-1 levels are not associated with CVDs. 10 , 18 , 19 However, information about serum Ang-1 and Ang-2 in dogs with CVDs has not been reported. Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Myxomatous mitral valve disease is the most common type of cardiac disease in dogs, 1 and a recent study 2 shows that signs of CHF developed later in dogs with preclinical MMVD treated with pimobendan versus a placebo. Identifying affected dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

D isease progression for dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is variable, with some dogs remaining free from clinical signs for their entire lives and others having progressive disease resulting in clinical signs, congestive heart

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are newly proposed inflammatory biomarkers for patients with heart disease. 6 , 7 Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common acquired heart disease in dogs and one of the most common causes of CHF. According to the American

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the large MMP family, the gelatinases are involved in cardiac remodeling processes. 6 Myxomatous mitral valve disease is by far the most common cardiac disorder in dogs, and the disease usually develops in middle-aged and old dogs. 7 The highest

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research