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Myxomatous mitral valve degeneration is the most common heart disease in dogs, accounting for approximately 75% of all dogs with heart disease. 1 It is a genetic disorder, but a causative mutation has not been identified. 2 As mitral valve

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

were either healthy (controls; A) or had myxomatous mitral valve degeneration (MMVD; B) between August 5, 2020, and July 19, 2023. PA and PV were measured at end systole, 1 frame before the mitral valve opens, or end of the T wave. When PV or PA were

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

had a history of myxomatous mitral valve degeneration, pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypertension, and arthritis. On physical examination, the dog had a grade 3/6 holosystolic left-sided cardiac murmur, gingival hyperplasia, and vital signs within

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

previous studies 23,24 have indicated a high prevalence of AF in medium- to large-breed dogs with myxomatous mitral valve degeneration and concurrent CHF, and the case described in the present report involved an Australian Shepherd that had CHF secondary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

without precordial thrill that was loudest over the apex on the left when the dog was auscultated in a standing position. The murmur was consistent with mitral valve regurgitation. Echocardiographic findings confirmed the presence of myxomatous mitral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(400×). Nodules in the urinary bladder were composed of a similar population of epithelial cells, often contained within submucosal lymphatic vessels. Histologic examination findings also confirmed the gross diagnoses of myxomatous mitral valve

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

conditions. Myxomatous mitral valve degeneration (MMVD) is the most common cause of mitral regurgitation and secondary left atrial dilation in dogs and is characterized by stretching and thickening of the chordae tendineae and nodules on the thickened

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, coarctation of the aorta, atrial septal defect, and subvalvular aneurysms. 1,12,17 No congenital cardiac abnormalities were found in the horse of the present report, although myxomatous mitral valve degeneration was an additional finding. Aorto

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

any cardiac medications at the time of the referral evaluation. Five years prior to the evaluation, a diagnosis of myxomatous mitral valve degeneration had been made. At that time, echocardiography revealed that the dog had apparently normal left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mitral valve degeneration with normal left atrial size and compensated ventricular function. The fluid-filled structure was seen adjacent to, and causing mild compression of, the right atrium. No flow was identified within the structure on color flow

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association