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resulting in an increased risk of multiple age-related comorbidities. Many diseases of aging compromise mobility, including metabolic, degenerative, musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neoplastic processes. Sarcopenia and obesity

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

physical activity, limited mobility, and changes in cognition). However, this phenomenon has not been well described in the literature, and a distinction between an expected amount of age-associated functional decline and a frail phenotype that exceeds an

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, respectively). Rostrocaudal mobility of the mandible was not significantly ( P = 0.38) associated with age. Compared with findings in the control group, dental floating did not significantly affect feed digestibility or fecal particle size (data not shown

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

High-mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 is an abundant and ubiquitous protein found in the nuclei and cytoplasm of nearly all cells. Its functions include maintenance of nucleosome structure and regulation of gene transcription. 1 More

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Osteoarthritis is an important clinical problem in cats, particularly among older patients, as it can be associated with signs of pain and impaired mobility. 1–7 Osteoarthritis appears to involve a complex pain state with nociceptive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The aging of the US population has been accompanied by an increase in the number of people with mobility-related disabilities, many of whom are pet owners. 1 For example, the 2017–2018 National Pet Owners Survey estimated that 68% of US

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of dental floating on the position of the mandible relative to the maxilla (a measure of rostrocaudal mobility [RCM] of the mandible) during extension and flexion of the head of horses.

Design—Randomized controlled blinded trial.

Animals—59 horses housed in 1 barn.

Procedure—Horses were formally randomized into a treatment (n = 33) or control (26) group. All horses were sedated, and the distance between rostral portions of the upper and lower incisor arcades were determined with the head fully extended and flexed at the poll (the difference in measurements represented the RCM of the mandible). The oral cavity was examined. For the treatment group, dental floating was performed, and the incisor arcade measurements were repeated.

Results—Dental correction resulted in a significant increase in RCM of the mandible in 31 of 33 horses. The mobility was greater in heavy horses than that detected in other breed classifications. Age and number of dental lesions did not significantly affect mobility before or after dental floating.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dental floating increased RCM of the mandible, but measurement of this variable was not an indicator of the number or extent of dental lesions, and no specific dental abnormality appeared to significantly affect RCM of the mandible in horses. In horses, measurement of RCM of the mandible can be used as a guide to determine whether dental correction is necessary; after dental floating, it can be used to ensure that irregularities of the occlusal surface have been corrected. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:666–669)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

distribution and composition in dromedary camels have not yet been fully examined. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate the lipid profile and electrophoretic mobility of lipoproteins in plasma samples obtained from dromedary camels

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine bladder neck positional changes between standing and recumbent positions in bitches and whether change is related to continence status or general anesthesia, or both, and to evaluate reproducibility of measurements.

Animals

45 continent animals and 46 incontinent bitches with urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (SMI).

Procedure

Distance between the bladder neck and perineal skin was measured ultrasonographically via the perineum while each dog was conscious in standing and right lateral recumbency and in right lateral recumbency under general anesthesia. Measurements of the bladder neck position obtained in right lateral recumbency under anesthesia were compared with radiographic measurements of the same parameter. Reproducibility of the ultrasonographic measurements of the distance between bladder neck and perineum was assessed on 3 occasions for each position in 50 dogs.

Results

In all dogs, differences in bladder neck position between standing and recumbent conscious-associated positions were not significant. However, caudal bladder neck movement between standing conscious- and recumbent anesthesia-associated positions and between recumbent conscious- and anesthesia-associated positions was significant for all dogs. Incontinent bitches had greater degree of caudal bladder movement during anesthesia. Mean difference in bladder neck positions between recumbent conscious- and recumbent anesthesia-associated positions was 0.24 cm in continent, compared with 0.73 cm in incontinent, bitches. Radiographic measurements were significantly greater than ultrasonographic measurements. Differences between repeated measurements for standing position were not significant, but those for recumbent conscious- and recumbent anesthesia-associated positions were significant.

Conclusions

Additional vesicourethral support mechanisms in continent dogs, are deficient in bitches with SMI, allowing the bladder neck to move further caudad. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:673-679)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

in assessing the mobility and activities associated with everyday life. Similarly, veterinary researchers are beginning to supplement in-office assessments with evaluation of behavior at home to assess health and quality of life in companion animals

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research