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postdiagnosis despite medical intervention. 2 In response to this alarming scenario, mitral valve repair (MVR) has emerged as a potentially curative intervention for MMVD in canines. 3 , 4 A fundamental step in MVR involves placing the heart in cardioplegic

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-breed dogs. Mitral valve repair basically consists of annuloplasty and chordal replacement. 12–15 In human patients, mitral annuloplasty has been stated to be the most important factor in maintaining the long-term durability of the mitral valve after MVR

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

90% of patients will undergo surgical intervention or die within 10 years of diagnosis. 7 In human patients with mitral valve regurgitation, mitral valve repair (MVR) is the only approach with defined clinical success. 7 , 8 Prompt surgical

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of clinical signs, extended survival time compared to medical management, and significant improvement in quality of life (QoL). 5 , 6 Currently, most papers describing outcomes of dogs undergoing mitral valve repair (MVR) predominantly center around

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe surgical techniques for and assess outcome of treatment of mitral regurgitation in dogs.

Design—Uncontrolled prospective study.

Animals—18 dogs with naturally occurring mitral regurgitation.

Procedure—All dogs weighed > 5 kg (11 lb) and had severe mitral regurgitation, congestive heart failure (CHF), and no serious noncardiac disease. Left ventricular volume indices, left atrial size, and degree of mitral regurgitation were determined echocardiographically before and after surgery. Repair techniques included circumferential annuloplasty, placement of artificial chordae, chordal fenestration and papillary muscle splitting, and edge-to-edge repair. Factors predictive for surgery survival and resolution of CHF were determined.

Results—12 dogs survived surgery. Factors predictive for surgery survival included weight > 10 kg (22 lb) and CHF of less than 6 months' duration. In 9 dogs, CHF resolved for a median period of 1 year (range, 4 months to 3 years) after surgery. One dog had stable CHF at 12 months. One dog died as a result of progressive CHF; another was euthanatized for a noncardiac reason. Left ventricular diastolic volume index was 226.9 ± 117.7 cm3/m2 before surgery and 134.9 ± 70.4 cm3/m2 at 6 months after surgery (n = 10). Factors predictive for resolution of CHF included left ventricular diastolic volume index < 250 cm3/m2 and systolic volume index < 70 cm3/m2.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Mitral valve repair may resolve CHF in dogs with severe mitral regurgitation, particularly in dogs that weigh > 10 kg and are treated within 6 months of the onset of CHF. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1941–1945)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council classification. See page 1188 Mitral valve repair under cardiopulmonary bypass in small-breed dogs In dogs with mitral regurgitation secondary to degenerative mitral valve disease, medical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

O ne current treatment option for severe mitral valve insufficiency is mitral valve repair. 1 It is performed under cardiopulmonary bypass, similar to human repair for the same condition. Humans have a 90% success rate compared to variable rates

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs . J Vet Cardiol 2012 ; 14 : 165 – 184 . 10.1016/j.jvc.2012.02.002 4. Mizuno T , Mizukoshi T , Uechi M . Long term outcome in dogs undergoing mitral valve repair with suture annuloplasty and chordae

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a previous history of partial atrioventricular septal defect and cleft mitral valve repair. Notice the positive deflections corresponding to atrial depolarization at a rate of 400 beats/min. These deflections do not have the characteristic features

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

develops in several other species 29–31 and is gaining in importance in human cardiology as populations age and expensive surgical intervention becomes commonplace. 32,33 Interestingly, there is greater success with mitral valve repair than with

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research