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A 2-year-old 13.7-kg (30.2-lb) spayed female Pembroke Welsh Corgi (dog 1) was referred for evaluation and possible minimally invasive treatment of a hepatic vascular anomaly. The dog had been examined by the referring veterinarian because of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Minimally invasive stereotactic brain biopsy procedures are available for veterinary patients; however, none are used for tumor resection because of the small-gauge needles that preclude efficient tissue resection and compromise biopsy specimen quality. 4

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

implant was considered to be the cause of the effusion, and screw removal was recommended. Figure 2— Dorsolateral-plantaromedial radiographic view of the tarsus of the horse in Figure 1 obtained 6 weeks after minimally invasive repair of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

medical record. ∥ As detected on follow-up echocardiography. NA= Not applicable. Twenty-one of 42 (50%) dogs underwent heart-worm extraction by means of a minimally invasive transvenous approach. Twenty-one (50%) dogs were not treated. Seventeen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

an access incision location on the ventral abdominal midline could be found that would provide repeatable minimally invasive access for collection of biopsy samples from most of the abdominal organs that are frequently biopsied in cats with multiorgan

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

myeloproliferative disease being most common. 2 , 8 Minimally invasive splenectomy became an established standard of care in the early 1990s to address a number of surgical splenic pathologies in humans. 9 In humans, total laparoscopic splenectomy (TLS) has been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

declined or the surgery was thought to be extremely difficult owing to the size of the horse. 15–18 The technique described in the present report, however, offers many important advantages because of its minimally invasive approach. In dogs, > 95% of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

). Intact cribriform plate is observed to the right and above. Dorsal is on top and lateral is to the left in the picture. The dog was prepared for a transnasal approach by use of the endoscope to facilitate a minimally invasive approach. The defect in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

obstruction in dogs are lacking; however, advancements in minimally invasive techniques and instrumentation combined with increased veterinary access to specialized equipment have contributed to enhanced outcomes following catheterization of other surgically

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dogs when performed through 1 or 2 intercostal thoracotomies. 5,7 A general trend toward increased use of minimally invasive procedures is occurring in veterinary surgery and may offer great advantages to patient care. However, at the time of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association