Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 79 items for :

  • "mechanical obstruction" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

G astrointestinal (GI) tract abnormalities are a frequent reason for owners presenting small animals to their veterinarian, and foreign body (FB) dietary indiscretion, whether causing mechanical obstruction or not, is a common concern recorded as

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Gastrointestinal obstruction is one of the primary differential diagnoses for vomiting dogs. 1,2 Plain radiography is a readily available screening test for the presence of mechanical obstruction. Radiographic features suggestive of mechanical

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

basis of findings on survey radiographic views of the abdomen. Although LFB is classically evidenced radiographically by a characteristic bunching of the small intestines, other mechanical obstructions can be harder to identify in the absence of a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the technique and determine outcome for male cats with urethral obstruction treated with fluoroscopically guided percutaneous antegrade urethral catheterization (PAUC).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 client-owned neutered male cats with urethral obstruction and inability to pass a retrograde urinary catheter.

Procedures—Information regarding the procedure and hospitalization was obtained from medical records. Long-term follow-up was obtained via medical record review or telephone interview.

Results—Diagnoses included iatrogenic urethral tear (n = 6), obstructive urethral calculi (1), urethral ulceration (1), and urethral stricture (1). Seven of the 9 procedures were successful. The 2 patients in which PAUC failed had mechanical obstructions preventing guide wire access across the urethral obstruction. Procedure times ranged from 25 to 120 minutes. No complications were noted in any patients during the procedure. One patient was euthanized because of unrelated disease. Follow-up information was available for 6 of 8 surviving patients. No complications that could be directly attributed to the procedure were noted. All 6 patients had a perineal urethrostomy performed 0 days to 6 weeks following the procedure because of reobstruction of the lower urinary tract. None of these patients had documented urethral strictures and none had recurrence of clinical signs following perineal urethrostomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that PAUC can be a simple, rapid, minimally invasive, and safe technique to facilitate transurethral catheterization in select cases. Patients with iatrogenic urethral tears may be good candidates. Patients with impacted urethral calculi, severe strictures or ulcerations, or a nondistended urinary bladder may be less amenable to PAUC.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 6-year-old 3.4-kg neutered male mixed-breed dog was presented to the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital for evaluation of a possible mechanical obstruction. The dog was presented to its referring veterinarian 1 month prior

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the abdomen. The remainder of the small intestines contained fluid and gas, without evidence of dilation. The remainder of the abdominal structures appeared radiographically normal. Based on these findings, mechanical obstruction was suspected with

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

small intestinal distension, small intestinal mechanical obstruction was suspected. Differential diagnoses for small intestinal mechanical obstruction include foreign body ingestion, adhesions, neoplasia, intussusception, and herniation with

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anastomosis 3 weeks previously for mechanical obstruction secondary to foreign body ingestion. The patient had a history of food allergies to some types of grain and poultry. No abnormalities were detected on abdominal palpation or rectal examination. The

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

peritoneal effusion. These changes were most consistent with neoplasia (differential diagnosis of carcinoma or less likely round cell) causing a chronic partial mechanical obstruction. Mild nonspecific hyperechoic hepatomegaly was also noted. Figure 3

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dilation of gas-filled viscera within the abdominal cavity. A nonstrangulating mechanical obstruction (ie, fecalith) of the descending colon was the primary differential diagnosis. In addition, a secondary nonstrangulating mechanical obstruction of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association