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anatomical/mechanical axis, maintaining approximately 30% of the normal cranial tibial thrust. 16 , 35 However, an evaluation of the degree of reduction in the magnitude of the initial AMA-angle with the DAA design described for planning the technique has

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

simulation software a ( Figure 1 ). Measurements of the proximal and distal joint orientation lines, mechanical axis of the tibia, and CORA for the affected limb were performed on digital radiographs as previously described. 1,2 The findings confirmed that

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the sagittal tibial mechanical axis as the 3-D printed RG. The remainder of the pin guide design was identical (mirror image) to the RG pin guide developed for that cadaver’s contralateral limb. In the RG group, a 3-D–printed RG was designed to be

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

advancement needed was measured in a cranial direction perpendicular to the tibial mechanical axis, not along the line of the tibial plateau slope. Subsequently described methods 22,25 also measure the amount of advancement needed in a cranial direction. The

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-plane proximal tibial joint orientation line (SPTJOL), the blue line the sagittal-plane mechanical axis (SMA), the yellow line the frontal-plane proximal tibial joint orientation line (FPTJO), the green line the frontal-plane mechanical axis (FMA), and the orange

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

each digital image and then create a line between 2 anatomic points and calculate the angle of intersection to the nearest degree. The TPA was measured as the angle between a perpendicular line to the mechanical axis of the tibia and tibial plateau

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in relation to the anatomic axis); and mLDHA (10; measured in relation to the mechanical axis [black line]). Figure 2— Three-dimensional drawings of the distal aspect of a canine humerus that provide a range for torsion of the humeral shaft

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mediodistal tibial angle were measured from the caudocranial tibial radiographs. The sagittal plane mechanical axis was drawn from the central aspect of the talus, extending proximally to bisect the midpoint between the apices of the medial and lateral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and patellar tendon thickening at the patellar tendon insertion. Lines represent the tibial sagittal plane mechanical axis (white line) and TTR (ratio of the tibial lengths proximal [blue line] vs distal [yellow line] to the level of the apex of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and presence of a conventional radiograph with no TC (NTC) and a radiograph taken under joint stress by means of TC, with visibility of the talus bone to delineate the tibial mechanical axis, overlapping femoral condyles with a maximum gap of 2 mm

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association