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Abstract

Discrete choice methods (DCMs) are a suite of research techniques for identifying individual preferences using choice information. Widely utilized by other fields yet rarely employed in veterinary research, DCMs have tremendous potential to improve veterinary healthcare by understanding and incorporating owner and veterinary professionals' (encompassing veterinarians, veterinary clinicians, technicians, receptionists, attendants, etc) preferences to optimize the care continuum. DCMs have several advantages over other stated preference methods, such as ranking and ratings, including improved data quality and actionability. However, they are not a panacea, and limitations that may affect DCMs' application to the veterinary field are outlined alongside realistic mitigation strategies. The information provided aims to increase awareness of DCMs and their utility in veterinary research and encourage greater uptake as a more robust method for measuring preferences.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

outcome variables generated by the PISBS (MINDIFF head , MAXDIFF head , SignedVS head , MINDIFF pelvis and MAXDIFF pelvis ) by their respective threshold values (6.0, 6.0, 8.5, 3.0, and 3.0 mm) or greater. Materials and Methods Horses This

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

amplitude during the first half of the stride will have values < 1. MinDiff and MaxDiff —The MinDiff was calculated as follows: in which min 1 is the first minimum reached during right forelimb or left hind limb stance phase and min 2 is the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, and the MAXDIFF and MINDIFF values, which are measures of the degree of asymmetry of pelvis movement over all collected strides, were recorded. After collection of inertial sensor data, diagnostic anesthesia was performed in the more severely

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Identify “Bad” Respondents in CBC, ACBC, and MaxDiff . Sawtooth Software Inc ; 2019 . 28. Kremser M. How to improve your survey data quality . Sawtooth Software Resources . Published October 24, 2022. Accessed July 17, 2023 . https

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association