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specific clinicopathologic parameter for the diagnosis of AP in the dog. 3 Until recently, the management of AP was mostly symptomatic and supportive, including identification and management of the cause of the disease, fluid therapy, recognition and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine feeding, cropping, and manure-handling practices of swine operations of various sizes.

Design—Producer survey.

Sample Population—85 sow units and 132 finish floors.

Procedure—Swine producers were surveyed by mail and during farm visits for information regarding herd characteristics and management practices, with emphasis on the 3 components of the nutrient cycle: cropping, feeding and nutrition, and manure handling. Farms were categorized by operation type as sow units or finish floors and, subsequently, stratified by size as small sow units (< 600 head), large sow units (≥ 600 head), small finish floors (< 2,000 head), and large finish floors (≥ 2,000 head).

Results—Large sow units and large finish floors were approximately twice as likely to use environmentally sound nutrient management practices as small sow units or small finish floors. These large operations were more likely to use progressive feeding practices, to be aware of their nutrient flows, and to be capable of using these nutrients properly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—There is a need for greater environmental awareness among all swine producers, especially among small producers. This provides a possible growth area for large-animal veterinary consultants. Economy of scale and increased governmental regulations allow large farms to use environmentally sound practices. Thus, large swine farms are not necessarily harmful to the environment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1526–1530)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

recent study 19 from our lab investigated changes in the microbiome associated with EGGD in horses under similar diet and management. Previous studies 8 , 9 , 20 in small numbers of horses have demonstrated that alterations in management or diet impact

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

trained individuals from 1 team or several teams for a specific mission assignment (ie, a water rescue team). Federal Emergency Management Agency approval for Human Remains Detection Canine Search Teams g was very recent, in May 2013, with certification

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To describe effects of season on milk production in Holstein dairy cows and to determine the location and effectiveness of fans and sprinklers in the management of stress attributable to season.

Design

Longitudinal observational study.

Animals

141 dairy herds for which owners used the Dairy Herd Improvement Association's database for production and reproduction record keeping.

Procedure

Owners were interviewed to identify location of fans, shade structures, and sprinklers. Production and reproduction data were retrieved from the database, and a mixed model ANOVA was used to estimate effects of season, parity, and use of sprinklers, and fans on milk production.

Results

Daily peak milk production decreased for all parity groups in the summer, but the effect decreased with increasing days in lactation. Use of sprinklers increased peak milk production in parity-1 and -3 or higher cows, but use of fans did not significantly alter effects of season. After calving in the summer, 305-day milk production decreased in parity-2 and -3 cows. This decrease was not significantly modified by the presence of sprinklers or fans.

Clinical Implications

Use of sprinklers may increase peak milk production in high-producing cows and could be recommended for reducing heat and total stress during this time. Production-oriented veterinarians should be cautious when recommending use of sprinklers and fans to increase production because of the wide confidence intervals describing their effectiveness. Management of parity-2 or higher cows so that they calve from October to June could increase 305-day milk production. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:85–88)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

postoperative urinary diversion during healing.  Dietary management to specific to urolith type May be used for urolith prevention. Radiography Survey radiography may help identify radiopaque uroliths, facilitate surgical planning, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

90° before surgery and 90° after surgery. Postoperative patient management was provided as described for the left pelvic limb. Six weeks after the second surgery, the owner reported that the dog had constant and good use of the right pelvic limb

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, with a Doppler-derived SAP of 62 mm Hg (reference interval, 90 to 140 mm Hg). No treatments were performed, and the dog was transferred to a veterinary referral hospital for management of suspected minoxidil toxicosis. On admission to the referral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Relationships between veterinarians and dairy herd managers vary greatly, and results of several studies 1–4 suggest that that relationship might be influenced by adoption of organic management practices. Canadian researchers reported that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association