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, paracetamol, gabapentin, amantadine, and tramadol), nutraceuticals, acupuncture, and low-level laser therapy. 6 , 7 Static (permanent) magnets (SMs) are widely available to treat chronic pain in people. Several double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate by use of radiography the efficacy of oral administration of magnets in the treatment of traumatic reticuloperitonitis in cows.

Animals—90 cows referred because of indigestion.

Procedure—Radiography of the reticulum was performed. In all cows, radiographic findings revealed a metal foreign body in the reticulum. A magnet was administered orally, and the reticulum was again radiographed to assess the position of the magnet and to determine whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet.

Results—The magnet was observed in the reticulum in 75 cows and in the cranial aspect of the dorsal sac of the rumen in 9 cows; in 6 cows, the magnet was not observed. The foreign body was fully attached to the magnet in 49 cows. In 6 cows, the foreign body was in contact with the magnet but still penetrated the reticulum. In 24 cows, the foreign body did not contact the magnet, and in 11 cows, it was not clear whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet. A foreign body at an angle to the ventral aspect of the reticulum of > 30° was less likely to become attached to a magnet, compared with a foreign body situated horizontally on the ventral aspect of the reticulum. A foreign body with no contact to the ventral aspect of the reticulum or a perforating foreign body was also less likely to become attached to a magnet.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Position of the foreign body within the reticulum greatly influences the efficacy of treatment with a magnet. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:115–120)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

available standing MRI systems have insufficient magnet strength, and the resolution is not appropriate for accurate dGEMRIC of equine cartilage, especially in areas where the cartilage is thin. Areas that warrant additional research include the effect of IV

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

imaging was performed by use of a scanner a with a super-conducting magnet operating at a field of 1.5 Tesla. The specimens were severed at the level of middle of the tibia and placed, with the tarsal and digital joints in extension, in a human extremity

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

gland imaging by use of thin-slice 3-dimensional GE MRI with a 0.2-Tesla open magnet; assess quality of the magnetic resonance images by varying the imaging plane, flip angle, and slice thickness; and determine the effect of administration of contrast

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-thawing cycles and 2 methods of thawing on SE, TSE, and GE MR images (obtained by use of a 3-T magnet) of equine feet examined ex vivo. To determine the effects of these physical conditions on the MR images, qualitative subjective image evaluation and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. MRI technique —Magnetic resonance imaging of each turtle was performed immediately after death with a 0.2-T magnet a and a head coil. b Turtle cadavers were kept intact and were positioned with the ventrum facing downward during the MRI procedure

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-thick consecutive images from the rostral clinoid processes to the dorsum sellae was acquired. MRI —Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a 0.2-Tesla open magnet c with dogs in sternal recumbency; a small multipurpose coil was used. Contrast medium d

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

disease related. Tumor volume measurements Existing MRI scans were used for tumor volume measurements. The advanced imaging had been performed at several referral institutions by use of scanners with magnet strengths that ranged between 0.5 and 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

creatine was lower in geriatric dogs, compared with those ratios in adult dogs. 39 That study was performed with a 1.5-T magnet and a long echo time point-resolved spectroscopy sequence that resulted in poor resolution of peaks of interest (ie, the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research