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Introduction Lymphadenectomy is known to be an important surgical procedure for the identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in veterinary medicine. 1 , 2 In addition to guiding prognosis and treatment plans, excisional LN

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymphadenectomy and histologic examination of the excised lymph nodes allow for identification of overt metastasis, small metastatic aggregates, and micrometastatic foci, especially when examination includes application of special and immunohistochemical stains

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. In human patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas and nodal metastasis, lymphadenectomy provides a therapeutic benefit by decreasing the risk of nodal recurrence, distant metastasis, and death. 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Lymphadenectomy is a commonly performed procedure in veterinary medicine and a recommended method of screening for metastatic disease in animals with certain neoplasms. 1 , 2 The presence of lymph node (LN) metastasis is an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

contrast, nodal metastasis is rarely reported in clinical series, with metastatic rates typically ranging from 0% to 15.7%; however, lymphadenectomy was not reported in some studies 4 , 6 , 18 , 19 or was inconsistently evaluated in others. 5 , 9 , 10 , 20

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

–66) 46.5 (22–70) 0.143 Hospitalization time (h) 27 (12–74) 44.5 (22–71) 0.047 Intraoperative complications All 5/31 (16) 5/15 (33) 0.345 Excluding lymphadenectomy 4/31 (13) 1/15 (7) 0

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, medial sternotomy, rib resection, or transdiaphragmatic), if lymphadenectomy was performed, complications associated with thoracostomy tube placement, and timing of tube placement. The histopathologic diagnosis of excised masses was confirmed by a board

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mass removal (n = 42), mass removal with skin flap (17), amputation (4), mastectomy (4), thoracic wall resection (3), lymphadenectomy (3), liposuction (2), hemipelvectomy (1), and sialoadenectomy (1). Location of surgery and drain placement was most

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

proportion of dogs that underwent a staged procedure had another procedure performed concurrently. Additional procedures for dogs in the single-session procedure group included additional cutaneous tumor excisions (n = 9), lymphadenectomy (1), splenectomy (2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

substantial bilateral sublumbar lymphadenopathy and 1 with minimally enlarged sublumbar lymph nodes) underwent sublumbar lymphadenectomy, and histologic evaluation of the extirpated lymph nodes was indicative of metastatic carcinoma for both cats. For the cat

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association