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Background Tendinopathy and desmopathy are major causes of lameness and reduced performance in horses. Tendon and ligament fibers have some elasticity, allowing for the elongation of fibers during exercise; injury occurs when the strain

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

accurate finite element model include simulating the anatomic structures (geometric aspects) and assigning the appropriate material properties to the constituent components of the model. Stiffness of the ligaments in the human wrist has been reported. 8

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Inflammation of the proximal aspect of the interosseus medius muscle, or suspensory ligament (SL), (ie, proximal suspensory desmitis) of one or both pelvic or thoracic limbs is a common cause of lameness of horses. 1 – 4 Most

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

musculoskeletal injuries involve the distal aspect of the forelimbs, with ligaments and tendons as the tissues most commonly affected. 1,3–5 Equine limbs primarily move in the sagittal plane, with some capacity for abduction or adduction and limited internal or

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

loading of the CdCL. 14 Shear force at the joint is minimized, and so is tension in the CrCL or the CdCL if the tibial plateau is approximately perpendicular to the patellar ligament. 2,15 The tibial plateau has to be defined for measurement reasons. On

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The SL of the forelimb is commonly injured in horses that participate in a variety of disciplines, including racehorses and sport horses. 1–5 Suspensory ligament desmitis is often associated with decreased performance and can be a career

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

with no lateral ridge. The CaCL was partially torn with fraying of the CaCL fibers and hyperemia of the ligament ( Figure 2 ) . The CrCL was probed and found to be grossly normal. Figure 2— Arthroscopic images of the affected stifle joints in a 5

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that the repair technique was not significantly associated with clinical outcome. However, the outcome measures for those 3 studies 3,4,6 were subjective and relied primarily on owner satisfaction. In the study by Beever et al, 3 a prosthetic ligament

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

I njury to the suspensory ligament (SL) of horses can be a career-ending injury across a multitude of disciplines. 1 – 3 Injuries to the SL, both in the forelimbs and the hind limbs, are typically discussed with reference to 3 regions. These

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Cranial cruciate ligament disease, which is clinically characterized by partial or complete rCCL, is a daunting orthopedic problem, with an estimated annual economic burden exceeding $1.3 billion for US pet owners. 1 Despite medical and surgical

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research