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Left-to-right shunting PDA is one of the most commonly recognized congenital diseases in dogs. 1,2 Substantial left-to-right shunting can lead to pathological pulmonary overcirculation and volume overload of left-sided cardiac structures

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

no longer indicated. Dogs diagnosed with a left-to-right shunting PDA that undergo surgical correction have been shown to have an increased survival rate and better long-term outcome compared to dogs that do not undergo surgical intervention. 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) decreasing to 1.81 m/s (diastole). The second jet entered the left pulmonary artery directly. ( Supplementary video SV1 ) An aortopulmonic vascular malformation with left-to-right-shunting was suspected. Because of the relatively low velocity, differentials

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cardiac changes that occurred following complete occlusion of uncomplicated left-to-right shunting PDA in dogs. We hypothesized that removal of the left-sided volume overload would result in reversal of eccentric hypertrophy, with return of left heart

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, indicating a large left-to-right shunt. 3 In addition, given the radiographic findings, left-sided congestive heart failure was suspected; however, pneumonia had not yet been ruled out. Amoxicillin–clavulanate potassium (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

blood vessels were mildly accentuated, consistent with pulmonary overcirculation secondary to a left to right shunt. As an incidental finding, there were multiple metallic objects in the craniodorsal area of the abdomen on the left side presumed to be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine factors associated with long-term survival in dogs treated surgically for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—52 dogs treated surgically for left-to-right shunting PDA.

Procedure—Data pertaining to age, breed, sex, body weight, clinical examination findings, type and duration of medical treatment, results of thoracic radiography and echocardiography, and surgical and postoperative complications were collected from records. Follow-up information was obtained from medical records or telephone interviews with owners or referring veterinarians.

Results—22 dogs had mitral valve regurgitation. Mean weight and age were not significantly different between dogs with or without mitral valve regurgitation. Twenty-four (46.2%) dogs had clinical signs related to cardiac insufficiency. Left atrial dilatation was observed in 56.3% of dogs that were radiographed. Sonographic imaging was used to diagnose left atrial dilatation in 23 dogs and left ventricular dilatation in 25 dogs. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 92% and 87%, respectively. Diagnosis of mitral valve regurgitation before surgery was not associated with the probability of survival. Age, weight, lethargy, preoperative treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and right atrial dilatation on radiographs at the time of surgery were negatively associated with probability of survival.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Surgical treatment of PDA was curative in young dogs without clinical signs of heart failure. Surgical correction of PDA should be recommended as early as possible after diagnosis, and mitral valve regurgitation is not a contraindication for surgery. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1794–1799)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. This is in keeping with the left-to-right shunting aspect of this bidirectionally shunting PDA. Left ventricular dilation and pulmonary overcirculation have also been described in cats with PDAs. 2 The left ventricular dilation resolved after surgical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

septal defect in which transcatheter closure of the defect had failed was examined. Echocardiography and radiography confirmed the diagnosis of ASD and revealed compensatory changes consistent with a large left-to-right shunting ASD. The owners declined

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the atrioventricular valve apparatus). Additionally, VSDs may be isolated, multiple, or concomitant with other CHDs. Isolated VSDs, regardless of the type, usually result in a left-to-right shunting across the defect, and both the magnitude of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association