Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 74 items for :

  • "intraoral radiography" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

associated with the right mandibular fourth premolar and first molar teeth. There is intrinsic staining associated with the right mandibular canine, fourth premolar, and first molar teeth. B—Intraoral radiographic image (obtained with a parallel technique) of

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.8%; Figure 3 ). Radiographic evidence of inflammation was identified for 59 (39.9%) RTRFs. Figure 1— Representative intraoral radiographic images obtained from dogs with RTRFs that were classified as buried (ie, the coronal end of the fragment was

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tooth. Sixteen days later, the dog was returned for general anesthesia, intraoral radiography, dental scaling and polishing, excisional biopsy of the gingival mass, and possible endodontic treatment of the right mandibular canine tooth. Following

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

article does not mention whether intraoral radiography was performed, a missing tooth or teeth is generally considered to be an indication for the use of intraoral radiography. This is an accurate diagnostic method to determine whether missing teeth are a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intraoral radiography was performed to screen for abnormalities or injuries not evident during the oral examination. An intraoral radiographic view of the caudal portion of the left mandible is provided ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1— Lateral intraoral

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Figure 2— Intraoral radiographic view of the caudal aspect of the right mandible (including the fourth premolar tooth, first molar tooth, and rostral portion of the second molar tooth) of the same dog as in Figure 1 . The image was obtained with a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the right side of the nasal cavity causing destruction of the nasal turbinates and several adjacent bony structures. Intraoral radiography performed under the same anesthetic episode revealed ill-defined periapical lucencies surrounding the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the skull in a llama evaluated for a mass involving the rostral portion of the mandible. Diagnostic Imaging Findings and Interpretation On the intraoral radiographic view, an expansile mass involving the right side of the mandible can be seen

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that “[w]hen procedures such as periodontal probing, intraoral radiography, dental scaling, and dental extraction are justified by the oral examination, they should be performed under anesthesia.” I do not recommend anesthesia for nonendodontic services

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The dog was anesthetized, and intraoral radiography and periodontal charting were performed. Selected radiographic views are provided ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1— Lateral radiographic views of the right mandibular premolar (A) and molar (B) teeth in a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association