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rods to improve torsional and compressive forces experienced by the affected bone, but from their clinical introduction in the 1950s until the early 2000s, the interlocking components of intramedullary nails were not designed to rigidly interact with

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the outcome of femoral fractures repaired with 4.0- and 4.7-mm interlocking intramedullary nails in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—12 cats with diaphyseal femoral fractures.

Procedure—Records of all cats in which the 4.0- and 4.7-mm interlocking nail system was used for repair of diaphyseal femoral fractures at the Animal Medical Center and Florida Veterinary Specialists between 1996 and 2000 were reviewed. Information included signalment, type of fracture, size of the implant, details of the surgery, intra- and postoperative complications, fracture healing, and clinical outcome.

Results—Femoral fractures in 12 cats were repaired. Eleven of the fractures were comminuted, with 2 of these being open. Clinical outcome was excellent in 7 cats, good in 3, and fair in 1. One resulted in a nonunion. Complications included screw breakage (1 cat) and fracture distal to the nail (1). Fracture distal to the nail occurred from a second trauma.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Use of the interlocking nail has been limited in cats because of the small diameter of the medullary canal. Use of the 4.0-mm nail will allow for greater application of this implant in small patients. Results of this study indicate that the 4.0- and 4.7-mm interlocking nails can be used to repair simple or comminuted diaphyseal femoral fractures in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1098–1104)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

recently, Nichols et al 7 reported on the use of intramedullary pinning with and without other orthopedic implants (cerclage wires and type I external fixators) and the use of an interlocking intramedullary nail for the treatment of mid-diaphysis and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Nineteen weanlings at the farm at which L intracellularis was endemic were treated for equine proliferative enteropathy, including 5 with clinical signs of EPE. See page 1482 Use of a novel intramedullary nail for femoral fracture repair in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

T . Interlocking intramedullary nail method for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures in cats and small dogs . J Vet Med Sci . 1998 ; 60 ( 1 ): 119 – 122 . doi: 10.1292/jvms.60.119 6. Bekos A , Sioutis S , Kostroglou A

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

offsetting the biological advantages of intramedullary nails. In addition to providing adequate stability, implants must be sufficiently strong to withstand loads during the early postoperative period, particularly when cortical continuity is not achieved

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-mm-diameter intramedullary nail. a The nail was inserted from the tibial plateau into the medullary canal, seated in the distal metaphysis, and interlocked with two 4.5-mm cortical screws at the proximal and distal ends of the bone. The surgical site

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Kowalski MJ , Swiontkowski MF , et al. Comparison of the effect of reamed and unreamed locked intramedullary nailing on blood flow in the callus and strength of union following fracture of the sheep tibia . J Orthop Res 1995 ; 13 : 382 – 389 . 10

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

RM , et al . Interlocking intramedullary nail fixation for a comminuted diaphyseal femoral fracture in an alpaca . Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 1999 ; 12 : 81 – 84 . 4 Manning JP . Fracture of the metacarpal bones in a llama . J Am Vet Med

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association