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Collection and evaluation of full-thickness small intestinal biopsy specimens is useful for investigation of small intestine physiology in experimental horses, 1–4 and serial collection of biopsy specimens is occasionally necessary to confirm

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Intestinal biopsy is used to diagnose chronic intestinal diseases in dogs and cats (eg, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], intestinal lymphoma [IL], lymphangiectasia, and metastatic disease). 1 , 2 The major complications reported

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

significant change was observed in values before and after treatment ( P = 0.4). No correlations between L:R, X:M, or S:M ratios and CIBDAI or histologic scoring of intestinal biopsy specimens were detected. Discussion In the dogs of this study

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-compatible clinical signs. A final diagnosis of IBD is confirmed via histologic examination of intestinal biopsy specimens 1,2,5,6 ; however, severe IBD can be difficult to distinguish histologically from intestinal lymphoma. Because animals with IBD or intestinal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, pyogranulomatous gastritis, plasmacytic gastritis, epithelial hyperplasia, lymphoid hyperplasia, foveal hyperplasia, histiocytic gastritis, and other miscellaneous findings were each recorded for 1 (1.5%) dog. Intestinal biopsy specimens were collected for 60 of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, intestinal biopsy, and complete cecal bypass. Celiotomy was performed via a right paramedian incision, and the cecum was found to be fluid filled, thickened hyperemic, and filling most of the abdomen. The cecum and large colon were emptied through a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

remaining 4 dogs, the referring veterinarian had undertaken such tests and they were not repeated in the present study. All dogs underwent survey abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography, and intestinal biopsies were performed. In 1 dog, full

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

exclusion of other potential disease processes and, in many cases, is dependent on response to various medical interventions or results of histologic examination of intestinal biopsy specimens. 2–4 Treatment is based on the subset type and severity of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate intestinal permeability and gluten sensitivity in a family of Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers (SCWT) affected with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), protein-losing nephropathy (PLN), or both.

Animals—6 affected adult dogs.

Procedure—Intestinal biopsy specimens, urine protein- to-creatinine ratio, serum concentrations of albumin and globulin, and concentration of α1-protease inhibitor in feces were evaluated before, during, and 13 weeks after daily administration of 10 g of gluten for 7 weeks. Eosinophils and lymphocytes-plasmacytes were enumerated in intestinal biopsy specimens. Intestinal permeability was evaluated before and during the sixth week of gluten administration via cellobiose-mannitol and chromium-EDTA absorption tests.

Results—Serum globulin concentration decreased significantly after prolonged administration of gluten. Although not significant, there was an increase in lymphocytes- plasmacytes and a decrease in eosinophils in intestinal biopsy specimens. Furthermore, these counts were greater than those reported for clinically normal dogs. Gluten administration did not increase intestinal permeability.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Daily administration of gluten was associated with a significant decrease in serum globulin concentration in SCWT affected with PLE or PLN, but other variables remained unchanged. Although enhanced wheatgluten sensitivity may be one factor involved in the pathogenesis of PLE or PLN in SCWT, this syndrome does not appear to be the result of a specific sensitivity to gluten. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:518–524)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research