Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • "injury prevention" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

previous study, 15 in addition to potential risk factors. Developing appropriate bite injury prevention and control measures requires a better understanding of the risks specific to CVTs. Consequently, the purpose of the study reported here was to identify

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

technician a. Copies of the questionnaire and associated written materials can be obtained from the Regional Injury Prevention Research Center, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota. Minnesota

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-794-8094. Acknowledgments The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health or the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health or the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Research in the present report relied on data from the NVDRS, a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Center for Injury Prevention and Control . Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) , 2015 . Available at: webappa.cdc.gov/sasweb/ncipc/mortrate.html . Accessed May 1, 2018. 37. Baca-Garcia E Perez-Rodriguez MM Keyes

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize animal-related injuries in veterinary medical center staff at a veterinary medical center.

SAMPLE

706 hospital staff injuries.

METHODS

Deidentified injury reports were submitted to Human Resources from 2008 through 2022. Injury data collected included the injury description, date of injury, occupation, and worker’s compensation claim information. Data were summarized by year, cause of injury, total cost associated with injury, and occupation.

RESULTS

There was an increase in injuries reported in recent years when compared to past years, with the plurality of injuries being bite injuries, specifically occurring on the hand, finger, and wrist area. Bite injuries had a higher average total worker’s compensation cost paid to staff than striking injuries. There were more injuries reported by staff who had less experience working with animals. More injuries occurred during the summer months (June through September). There was not an unusual trend in the reporting of injuries due to COVID-19. Other injuries (eg, needlesticks and falls) were reported from only 2019 to 2022, but constituted a substantial burden for staff.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

These findings can help stakeholders at teaching hospitals and veterinary clinics to take steps toward creating a safer workplace environment for employees. It is important to identify work hazards and provide proper training and prevention methods to reduce the risk of injuries, especially among less experienced employees. Proper prevention methods will help reduce worker’s compensation costs for the teaching hospital and reduce the number of workdays missed by staff.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To summarize breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks during a 20-year period and to assess policy implications.

Animals—Dogs for which breed was reported involved in attacks on humans between 1979 and 1998 that resulted in human dog bite-related fatalities (DBRF).

Procedure—Data for human DBRF identified previously for the period of 1979 through 1996 were combined with human DBRF newly identified for 1997 and 1998. Human DBRF were identified by searching news accounts and by use of The Humane Society of the United States' registry databank.

Results—During 1997 and 1998, at least 27 people died of dog bite attacks (18 in 1997 and 9 in 1998). At least 25 breeds of dogs have been involved in 238 human DBRF during the past 20 years. Pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers were involved in more than half of these deaths. Of 227 reports with relevant data, 55 (24%) human deaths involved unrestrained dogs off their owners' property, 133 (58%) involved unrestrained dogs on their owners' property, 38 (17%) involved restrained dogs on their owners' property, and 1 (< 1%) involved a restrained dog off its owner's property.

Conclusions—Although fatal attacks on humans appear to be a breed-specific problem (pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers), other breeds may bite and cause fatalities at higher rates. Because of difficulties inherent in determining a dog's breed with certainty, enforcement of breed-specific ordinances raises constitutional and practical issues. Fatal attacks represent a small proportion of dog bite injuries to humans and, therefore, should not be the primary factor driving public policy concerning dangerous dogs. Many practical alternatives to breed-specific ordinances exist and hold promise for prevention of dog bites. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:836–840)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objectives

To determine characteristics of working dogs used during the disaster response after the bombing in Oklahoma City and risk factors for injuries and illnesses of those dogs, and to document recommendations for future disaster responses.

Design

Survey.

Study Population

Information for 74 working dogs used at the bombing site.

Procedures

Dog handlers were identified and asked to complete a questionnaire. Questions were asked about the training and use of each dog, use of paw protection, injuries and illnesses incurred, possible effects after completion of duty at Oklahoma City, and handler's experience.

Results

Data were obtained for all 74 dogs used at the site. Handlers of 69 of 74 (93%) dogs responded. The dogs had been extensively trained and were used 491 dog-days at the site, with 46 dogs used in search, 14 in patrol, 12 in explosive-detection duty, and 2 in search/patrol. Fifteen (22%) dogs became ill. Nineteen (28%) dogs incurred 20 injuries. Footpad injuries constituted 18 of the injuries. Only 16 of 69 (23%) dogs were provided with paw protection. Dogs were more likely to be injured when they were used in a search capacity, were used during the first 2 days after the bombing, were German Shepherd Dogs, or were older.

Clinical Implications

Although working in a highrisk environment, injuries to dogs were few, and most were minor. Specific recommendations could facilitate use of dogs in disaster situations and improve safety for those dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1202–1207)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,26,29 Pediatricians in particular can play a vital role in injury-prevention counseling for children and parents (in both dog-owning and non– dog-owning families) during routine medical visits. 32 Lowcost spay and neuter surgeries need to be easily accessible in the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To determine incidence of child-related dog bites and sensitivities of 3 county health department dog-bite surveillance systems.

Design—Retrospective study.

Study Population—Child-related dog-bite data obtained from surveillance systems of 3 counties in Georgia in the year 2000.

Procedure—To characterize the sensitivity of health department dog-bite surveillance systems, 9 other potential sources of dog-bite records that matched records by victim name, age, gender, and incident date were evaluated. The number of reported bites and the most productive sources for identifying additional cases were determined. The Chandra Sekar- Deming capture-recapture method was used to estimate the number of unreported bites, and estimates of dog-bite incidence rates were made.

Results—40, 36, and 185 dog bites were reported in the 3 counties, respectively. Capture-recapture calculations estimated an additional 9, 5, and 128 dog bites in these counties, respectively. Local health departments recorded 45.5% to 82.5% of dog bites. Local hospital emergency departments, police departments, and a rabies-testing laboratory received additional reports. Among these data sources, local hospital emergency department records were the best source for identifying additional cases.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dog bites are a preventable cause of childhood injuries, and surveillance is a critical tool for tracking childhood dog bites in the community. Counties should use combined data from local health departments, local hospital emergency departments, and police departments to implement or revise dog-bite prevention programs (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1680–1683)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association