Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "infrared thermometer" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

report a temperature reading, exposing equine practitioners to the risk of kick injury for a significant period of time. Noncontact infrared thermometers became common for measurement of human body temperature during the COVID-19 pandemic and may be a

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Noncontact infrared thermometers (NCITs) use pyroelectric sensors to measure infrared radiation emanating from the skin or forehead supplied by the temporal artery. They have gained popularity in human medicine in 2020 largely as a result of the SARS-COV2

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

easily accessible anatomic site. 2,6,9 Infrared thermometers measure the amount of radiation emitted from the tympanic membrane via a sensor probe. 13 The probe detects the thermal source, and the infrared radiation is converted to an electric signal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To investigate effects of ear type, sex, age, body weight, and ambient climatic conditions on external acoustic meatus (external ear canal) temperatures in dogs.

Animals

650 dogs without clinical signs of ear disease.

Procedure

Dogs were assigned to 5 groups on the basis of auricular conformation and amount of hair in the external ear canal and 4 groups on the basis of body weight or age. External ear canal temperatures (EECT) were measured, using an infrared thermometer. Mean EECT determined for each group were compared to evaluate effects of ear type, age, weight, and sex, and EECT measured at different ambient temperatures and humidities were compared to determine climatic effects

Results

Dogs with hirsute ear canals had significantly lower EECT than dogs with hairless ear canals, whereas significant differences were not detected between dogs with erect and pendulous auricles. Dogs < 6 years old had higher EECT than older dogs, and dogs that weighed < 6 kg had lower EECT than larger dogs. External ear canal temperatures measured when ambient temperatures were < 25 C were less than those measured at warmer temperatures. Sex and relative humidity did not affect EECT.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

EECT of dogs without ear disease were affected by weight and age, amount of hair in the external ear canal, and ambient temperature. However, hirsute ears had lower, not higher, EECT than hairless ears, suggesting that EECT may play less of a role in the development of otitis externa than believed. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1173-1176)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,23 Veterinary studies 24–30 conducted to compare rectal, auricular, subcutaneous temperature-sensing microchip, infrared thermometer, and pulmonary arterial temperatures have also been performed. Commercially available digital thermometers typically are used

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

tympanic infrared thermometers had significant systematic and proportional bias. Also, rectal temperature readings obtained at a depth of 2 cm were consistently higher than those obtained at 1 cm, and manual restraint had a significant effect on rectal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, skin temperature was measured in the treated area as well as in the corresponding contralateral control area by use of an infrared thermometer. d The standard operating procedure and instructions specific for the infrared thermometer were followed. The

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

coronary bands and the control point was measured hourly from 8:00 am to 10:00 pm by use of an infrared thermometer d for the 4 days each diet was fed. At the same times, a rectal thermometer was used to measure the rectal temperature of each horse and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

nose twitch. Evaluation of inflammation —At each examination time point, skin temperature over the dorsal aspect of the radiocarpal joint was measured with an infrared thermometer. e The emissivity of the infrared thermometer was set at 0.98, and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

portable infrared thermometer was used, the effect of ambient temperature on surface temperature in equine limbs was evaluated. The researchers found that ambient temperature affected proximal limb surface temperature at the shoulder and hip, but that the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association