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diseases) warrants further investigation. ABBREVIATIONS CI Confidence interval CIBDAI Canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index CRP C-reactive protein IBD Inflammatory bowel disease IL Interleukin ROC Receiver operating

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of disorders that is characterized by persistent or recurrent gastrointestinal signs and evidence of intestinal inflammation via histologic examination. The disease is a common cause of chronic vomiting and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Inflammatory bowel disease in dogs is a chronic enteropathy with gastrointestinal signs that persist for at least 6 weeks related to the loss of tolerance for endogenous microflora, food, or endogenous antigens that develops in genetically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Inflammatory bowel disease in dogs is a group of disorders characterized by persistent or recurrent gastrointestinal tract signs and histologic evidence of intestinal inflammation. The disease is a common cause of chronic vomiting and diarrhea in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-1676.1989.tb03082.x 4. Carrasco V Rodriguez-Bertos A Rodriguez-Franco F , et al. Distinguishing intestinal lymphoma from inflammatory bowel disease in canine duodenal endoscopic biopsy samples . Vet Pathol 2015 ; 52 : 668 – 675 . 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Inflammatory bowel disease includes several diseases that are considered idiopathic and are characterized by histologic evidence of chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria of the intestinal tract mucosa. 1–3 Inflammatory bowel

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

GI Gastrointestinal IBD Inflammatory bowel disease mAb Monoclonal antibody TBS Tris-buffered saline Footnotes a. Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz. b. Sigma-Aldrich Corp, St Louis, Mo. c. Vectastain ABC kit, Vector Laboratories

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

disease and may range from treatments with antimicrobials and diet modification to immunosuppressive therapy. 2–4 Inflammatory bowel disease in birds is poorly described. The only published comment regarding this disorder in avian species of which the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Inflammatory bowel disease and alimentary tract lymphosarcoma are common conditions that cause chronic gastrointestinal tract disease in cats. Clinical signs include weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, and variation in appetite. Differential

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine clinical and surgical abnormalities in, and long-term outcome of, horses that undergo surgery because of colic secondary to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

11 horses.

Procedure

Medical records of horses that had undergone abdominal surgery and in which IBD had been diagnosed on the basis of histologic examination of intestinal biopsy specimens were reviewed.

Results

5 horses were examined because of acute colic and 6 were examined because of chronic colic. At surgery, all 11 horses had edematous or hemorrhagic bowel segments suggestive of IBD. In addition, 6 horses had circumferential mural bands (CMB) causing constriction of the small (4 horses) or large (2) intestine. Intestinal resections were performed in 7 horses. All 11 horses survived surgery and were discharged from the hospital; 10 horses were still alive at the time of follow-up (1.5 to 7 years after surgery).

Clinical Implications

Results suggest that IBD is an uncommon cause of colic in horses. Surgical resection of segments of intestine with constrictive CMB may relieve clinical signs of colic. Horses with IBD that had surgery had a good prognosis for long-term survival. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1527-1531)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association