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D isorders of equine incisors are common, and traumatic fractures or abrasive wear may result in pulpitis with secondary periapical disease and eventual pulp death. 1 Young horses are particularly prone to traumatic fractures of the incisors, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, including fistula, gingiva retraction, dental calculus, gingivitis, tooth mobility, and bite angle, were considered. Documentation was supported by photographs. A scoring system was created for incisor and canine calculus ( Table 1 ) , and the Triadan

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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unremarkable. Diagnostic Findings and Interpretation Oral examination revealed mild class II malocclusion. Bilateral maxillary deciduous incisors were present; the first incisors (501, 601) and second incisors (502, 602) were retained labial to the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the mandibular incisor teeth, marked inflammation of the left mandible, and crepitus and signs of pain during lateralization of the left mandible. Diagnostic Findings and Interpretation The guinea pig was sedated with midazolam (0.5 mg/kg, SC

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

teeth 701 to 704 (modified Triadan teeth numbering system [ie, left incisors 1 through 4]; Figure 1 ). Figure 1 Photographs of the rostral aspect of the oral cavity of an anesthetized < 1-day-old female Swiss Fleckvieh calf (patient 1) with an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 18-year-old Quarter Horse mare was evaluated at the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital because of a mass over the right maxillary incisors. The right third incisor had been extracted approximately 18 months earlier

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mandibular distoclusion, 1 [2%]; Figure 1 ). Malocclusion of the canine teeth (cats, 30% [15/50]; teeth, 2.1% [28/1,349]) and crowding of the incisor teeth (cats, 50% [25/50]; teeth, 5.9% [79/1,349]) were most common. Twenty-eight of the 50 (56%) cats had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surrounding edema was palpated on the rostroventral aspect of the ramus of the left mandible. The right maxillary incisor tooth was missing (cause unknown). All other teeth, including the mandibular incisor teeth, appeared normal on dental examination. The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

kinematic studies 2 , a of mastication in horses have provided a clear definition of the movement of the equine mandible during the chewing cycle. At the beginning of the chewing cycle in horses, when the incisors are in contact, the occlusal surfaces of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

E quine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a painful and progressive dental disease, which affects the incisor and canine teeth of senior horses. 1 According to Vlaminck et al, 2 Icelandic horses appear to be more

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association