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immunotherapy for human cancer . Science . 2018 ; 359 ( 6382 ) :1361 – 1365 . doi: 10.1126/science.aar6711 2. Mata M , Vera JF , Gerken C , et al . Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in canine and feline allergic skin disease due to environmental allergens, 14 – 16 allergen (-specific) immunotherapy is currently the only causative and definite treatment. 17 , 18 Allergen immunotherapy consists of the administration of offending

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Biological effects of staphylococcal protein A (spa) immunotherapy were studied in 5 viremic and 6 nonviremic cats with induced FeLV infection and in 6 control cats. The spa therapy neither reversed FeLV viremia nor resulted in consistent improvement in humoral immune responses to FeLV antigens. However, spa immunotherapy induced a proliferative response in bone marrow granulocytic lineage, possibly resulting in expression of FeLV-free mature neutrophils in the blood. Seemingly, viral burden and chemiluminescent responses were reversed in viremic cats during spa immunotherapy.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology’s theme, Anticancer Discovery from Pets to People. The latest research breakthrough uses a novel anchored immunotherapy for oral melanoma in dogs. A clinical trial launched in July 2022 partners with Ankyra

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the safety of an abbreviated course of injections of allergen extracts (rush immunotherapy) for the treatment of dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Animals—30 dogs with atopic dermatitis examined at a veterinary dermatology referral practice for treatment with allergen-specific immunotherapy.

Procedure—A catheter was placed in a vein in each dog. Dogs were constantly observed throughout the procedure. Allergen extracts were administered in increasing concentrations every 30 minutes for 6 hours to a maintenance concentration of 20,000 protein nitrogen units/ml. Epinephrine, oxygen, and emergency treatment were available as needed.

Results—In 22 (73%) dogs, rush immunotherapy safely replaced the prolonged induction period (15 weeks) of weekly injections that consists of increasing concentrations of allergen extract. In 7 (23%) dogs, the induction period was abbreviated to 4 weeks. Of the 8 dogs that developed problems during rush immunotherapy, increased pruritus necessitated premature cessation of rush immunotherapy in 7, and 1 developed generalized wheals. Oral administration of prednisolone (1 mg/kg of body weight) resulted in resolution of adverse effects in all 8 dogs.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Rush immunotherapy performed by personnel at a veterinary hospital is a safe method for treatment of dogs with atopic dermatitis. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:307–310)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

medical treatment, surgical treatment, and immunotherapy in a patient with chronic and advanced colonic pythiosis. Prior to definitive surgery, the disease had considerably progressed in the face of medical management. Surgical resection was extensive, but

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

here was to determine whether the size of primary intracranial glioma was associated with MST in dogs treated by curative-intent surgical debulking and autologous vaccine-based immunotherapy. Our hypothesis was that overall survival time would be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association