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Introduction Immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is a noninfectious, inflammatory polyarthropathy associated with type III hypersensitivity. 1 – 3 Immunologic stimuli and subsequent immune response lead to immune complex deposition within

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated polyarthritis is a common arthritic condition in dogs. First reported in the 1970s, IMPA is characterized as an inflammatory arthropathy, responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, for which no infectious etiology has been determined

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,8–11 Immune-mediated polyarthritis typically results in nonerosive lesions; IMPA-associated erosive lesions and bone destruction are rare. The term canine rheumatoid arthritis has been used to describe erosive IMPA, 12,13 but the latter term will be used

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated polyarthritis is an important cause of lameness and fever in dogs. In 1 study, 1 20% of dogs with fever of unknown origin had polyarthritis. Middle-aged large-breed dogs may be overrepresented. 2 The pathogenesis of IMPA is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical signs, laboratory findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment for type I immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—39 dogs.

Procedure—Clinical records and radiographic reports from 3 university referral hospitals were reviewed. Clinical signs, laboratory and investigative findings, relationship to vaccination, and response to treatment were evaluated.

Results—Clinical signs and initial laboratory and clinical investigative findings were frequently abnormal but were nonspecific and not associated with likelihood of recovery. Time of vaccination was not associated with onset of disease. Chemotherapeutic immunosuppression resulted in complete cure in 56% of dogs. Continuous medication was required in 18% (7/39) of dogs, relapses were treated successfully in 13% (5/39) of dogs, and 15% (6/39) of dogs died or were euthanatized as a result of disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The possible involvement of vaccination in type I IMPA was not made clear from this study because of the small population size. Signalment, clinical signs, and results of diagnostic tests other than multiple synovial fluid analyses were generally nonspecific. Most dogs with type I IMPA responded to initial immunosuppressive treatment, but 31% (12/39) of dogs relapsed, required further treatment, or both. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1323–1327)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, while radiographs of both stifles and tarsi revealed effusion and raised concern for immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA). The patient was discharged with instructions to stop carprofen in the instance of immune-mediated disease and recommendations for

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were more consistent with septic or immune-mediated polyarthritis), ECG findings (ie, detection of arrhythmia and type of arrhythmia [other than sinus tachycardia] or conduction defect), echocardiographic findings (ie, description of lesions if observed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that 35 of 43 (81%) dogs with idiopathic, nonerosive immune-mediated polyarthritis were treated with immunosuppressive drugs, including prednisolone. In the dog of the present report, resolution of polyarthritis following splenectomy suggested that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

polyarthritis Immune-mediated polyarthritis is a common noninfectious arthritis caused by idiopathic accumulation of inflammatory immune complexes in the synovial membrane of affected joints. Most often, IMPA results in nonerosive lesions, but erosive lesions

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

paraplegia and referral evaluation was not associated with a poorer prognosis. See page 386 Prednisone versus cyclosporine for treatment of dogs with primary immune-mediated polyarthritis Oral administration of immunosuppressive doses of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association