Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 152 items for :

  • "immune-mediated hemolytic anemia" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

IMHA Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia a. Normosol-R, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill. b. Baytril, Bayer Healthcare LLC, Shawnee Mission, Kan. c. Exact, Kaytee, Chilton, Wis. d. Neoral, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ. e

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a primary or secondary immunologic disorder in which antibodies bound to the surface of the RBCs facilitate their destruction, either via intravascular or extravascular hemolysis, the latter of which involves

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a condition in which autoantibodies bind to the erythrocyte membrane and lead to the premature destruction of RBCs. This condition is the most common hemolytic disorder in dogs, and it can be classified as a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

MPC measurement can be included in a routine CBC and therefore be performed inexpensively and quickly. 4 Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a common hematologic disorder in dogs and can be primary or secondary in nature. Most dogs with IMHA have

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

been proposed to occur in people and laboratory animals. Further, our findings suggested that TPE may be a useful alternative in dogs with refractory IMHA when traditional treatments have failed. ABBREVIATIONS IMHA Immune-mediated hemolytic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. ABBREVIATIONS ANA Antinuclear antibodies ANCA Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies CI Confidence interval IBD Inflammatory bowel disease IFA Indirect immunofluorescence assay IMHA Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia pANCA Perinuclear

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. ABBREVIATIONS CVC Caudal vena cava IMHA Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia MA Maximum amplitude PV Portal vein TEG Thromboelastography Footnotes a. Hemostasis analyzer 5000, Haemonetics, Niles, Ill. b. GE Logiq S8, GE Medical Systems

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Detection of autoantibody, complement, or both bound to rbc is an essential requirement for unequivocal diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs. An enzyme-linked antiglobulin test was adapted for laboratory diagnosis of this disease. The refinement and routine use of this assay have allowed further observation of the pathogenesis of the disease process. In particular, degree of hemolysis can be related to the degree of rbc sensitization associated with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, and this correlation is highest for IgG autoantibody. Results indicate that autoantibody isotype might have an important role in the hemolytic process.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum vitamin E concentrations in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) and healthy control dogs.

Sample Population—Serum and plasma samples from 36 dogs with IMHA and 40 healthy control dogs.

Procedure—Blood samples were collected from all study dogs. Plasma MDA concentrations were measured by use of a commercial colorimetric assay, and serum vitamin E concentrations (α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol concentrations) were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—Plasma MDA concentrations were significantly higher in the dogs with IMHA than in the control dogs. Compared with control dogs, serum α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol concentrations were significantly lower in the IMHA-affected dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated a state of oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant reserve in dogs with IMHA; this finding provides support for further investigation of the potential benefits of antioxidant treatment in dogs with this disease. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1621–1624)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary:

Forty-two cases of Coombs' positive or agglutinating immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (imha) in dogs were reviewed. Dogs ranged in age from 1 to 13 years, with a mean age of 6.4 ± 3.4 years. The majority of dogs (74%) tested positive for IgG antibodies without complement. Spherocytosis was seen in 67% of the dogs, but hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria were found in only 10%. Marked bilirubinuria was found in all the dogs. A significant seasonal incidence was observed, with 40% of all cases diagnosed during the months of May and fune. Severe anemia, with pcv ≤ 20% was observed in 37 dogs (88%). Sixteen dogs (38%) had moderate to severe reticulocytosis and 12 dogs (29%) had mild reticulocytosis. Thus, the absence of reticulocytosis should not be used to rule out a diagnosis of imha. Concomitant mild to severe thrombocytopenia was observed in 28 dogs (67%). A mortality of 29% was observed during hospitalization. Risk of death was significantly increased in dogs without marked reticulocytosis, those with lower pcv, and dogs with serum bilirubin concentrations ≥ 10 mg/dl. In severe cases of imha, rapid and aggressive supportive therapy is required.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association