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Introduction Although the interest in using MRI to diagnose neurological disorders in dogs is increasing, the cold examination environment and prohibition of commercial active heating instruments during the procedure contribute to hypothermia

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To document any discordance between the set temperature and independently measured temperature of neonatal incubators in order to determine the potential of neonatal incubators to cause hypothermia or hyperthermia in neonatal animals.

SAMPLE

5 different veterinary neonatal incubators from 2 separate manufacturers.

METHODS

Internal temperatures of 5 incubators from 2 manufacturers were monitored with both internal and external monitoring devices to determine how much incubator temperatures might vary from what is reported on the incubator thermostat. The study was conducted on May 25, 2022.

RESULTS

Increases in temperature as measured by thermocouple and infrared sensors of > 2 °C were detected in 3 of the 5 (60%; 95% CI, 17% to 93%) tested incubators. Temperatures exceeded 41 °C at times, despite the incubator thermostat being set to 35 °C.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Neonatal puppies have a decreased capacity to thermoregulate and are susceptible to both hypothermia and hyperthermia if environmental temperatures are not kept within a proper range. Core temperatures below 35.0 °C lead to bradycardia, dyspnea, loss of suckle reflex, hypoglycemia, gastrointestinal ileus, and multiple organ failure; temperatures above 41.1 °C lead to pulmonary edema, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhage in multiple organs, and death.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Hypothermia is a common complication of general anesthesia in small animal practice. The incidence of postanesthetic hypothermia in dogs 1 and cats 2 that do not receive heat support during general anesthesia is reportedly 83.6% and 97

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

physiologic capability to maintain a constant core body temperature, regardless of variations in environmental temperature. 10 When a homeothermic animal has a subnormal core body temperature, this is known as hypothermia. 11 , 12 Hypothermia is classified

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
Authors and

Summary:

Surface-induced hypothermia is used to protect tissues from ischemic events during surgery. In a review of 19 clinical cases in dogs, the technique was used to enable intracardiac surgery (4 dogs) and to facilitate removal of extensive thoracic or abdominal masses (15 dogs). For 16 dogs (84%), anesthesia was induced with an opioid/benzodiazepine combination and maintained with a balanced technique by use of an opioid, a neuromuscular blocking agent, and iso-flurane in oxygen. Dogs were cooled in an ice bath to a mean esophageal temperature of 27.8 ± 1.4 C. Mean anesthesia time was 4.04 ± 1.37 hours. Hypothermic-induced adverse effects, such as increased blood viscosity, increased myocardial irritability, and shivering, were managed by hemodilution, manipulation of acid-base balance, and administration of opioid and neuromuscular blocking agents. Complications requiring treatment included severe hypotension (74%), arrhythmias (47%), hypoxemia (42%), and acidemia (58%). Six dogs (32%) went into cardiac arrest and all were successfully resuscitated once the surgical procedure was completed. One dog was euthanatized during surgery, another died after surgery, and the 17 remaining dogs (90%) were discharged from the hospital to their owners. The technique appears beneficial in selected cases to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with the risk of prolonged ischemia and life-threatening hemorrhage.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinical signs and clinicopathologic findings in donkeys with hypothermia.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—10 hypothermic donkeys.

Procedure—Information on signalment, history, physical examination findings, results of diagnostic tests, treatments, and necropsy findings was extracted from medical records of all donkeys with hypothermia between 1988 and 1998 and compared with information from medical records of all normothermic donkeys and hypothermic horses admitted to the hospital during the same period.

Results—Donkeys were more likely to be hypothermic than horses. The mean age of hypothermic donkeys was 6 years (range, 7 months to 11 years), compared with 4.2 years (range, < 1 month to 15 years) for normothermic donkeys; this difference was not significant. Ten of 12 horses with hypothermia were neonates; there were no hypothermic neonatal donkeys. At admission, 7 of 8 hypothermic donkeys were in good body condition and all hypothermic donkeys were weak. Six hypothermic donkeys were able to maintain sternal recumbency, 1 remained in lateral recumbency, and 3 were able to stand. Of the 10 hypothermic donkeys, 2 survived, 1 died, and 7 were euthanatized. Histologically, the thyroid glands from 4 of 5 hypothermic donkeys appeared abnormal and were similar to those of foals with hypothyroidism. During the months that hypothermic donkeys were admitted, there was not a significant difference in environmental temperatures on days of admission between hypothermic and normothermic donkeys.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hypothermia is a problem in donkeys during cold winter months, and may not be secondary to other diseases or related to diet or management. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:725–729)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of evidence that hypothermia results in analgesia, concerns that the reduced mobility or torpidity associated with hypothermia would result in an inability to react to aversive stimuli, and worries that ice-crystal formation in the tissues could

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, endocrine, digestive, and urinary systems. 1 Hypothermia may develop as a consequence of various triggers. 2–5 In neonates, hypothermia develops as a consequence of multiple routes of heat loss (ie, evaporative, convective, and conductive). 6–9 In trauma

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Hypothermia is a common complication during the perianesthetic period in dogs 1 and has been associated with multiple postoperative complications, including prolonged recovery, increased susceptibility to infection, delayed wound

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association