Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 187 items for :

  • "hyperkalemia" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

/L). Hyperkalemia was presumed to be the cause of the sudden bradycardia and loss of P waves. A bolus of physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution k (10 mL/kg [4.5 mL/lb], IV) was administered, isoflurane delivery was discontinued, and dental care was rapidly

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

institution’s reference ranges. Hyperkalemia was defined as mild (4.8 to 5.7 mEq/L), moderate (5.8 to 6.7 mEq/L), and severe (≥ 6.8 mEq/L). 10 Ionized hypercalcemia was defined as mild (> 5.3 and < 5.82 mg/dL or < 1.33 and < 1.46 mmol/L) and moderate (≥ 5

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

complication because hyperkalemia can lead to cardiac arrhythmias. 9 In addition, hyperkalemia can occur when myoglobin, released from degenerating muscle cells, is taken up by and damages renal tubular cells, which can lead to renal insufficiency

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/μL], moderate leukocytosis [15,001 to 20,000 leukocytes/L], or severe leukocytosis [> 20,000 leukocytes/μL]), hypokalemia (none, mild hypokalemia [3.1 to 3.6 mmol/L], moderate hypokalemia [2.5 to 3.0 mmol/L], or severe hypokalemia [< 2.5 mmol/L]), hyperkalemia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

renal tubule to reabsorb sodium in exchange for potassium, leading to the electrolyte changes of hyponatremia and hyperkalemia classically associated with Addison's disease. Failure of renal sodium conservation results in dehydration, prerenal azotemia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

uroperitoneum or ruptured urethra with subcutaneous urine pooling. 5 Laboratory abnormalities associated with obstructive urolithiasis in most nonruminant species include azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. 6

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association