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human and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism (HAC). Literature reviews have suggested a high risk for venous thromboembolism in human patients with HAC. 14 – 17 Dogs with HAC have also been reported to have evidence of hypercoagulability based on TEG

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

seen in mammalian hyperadrenocorticism. 1 Thus, an ACTH stimulation test was recommended to evaluate the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal axis. An ACTH stimulation test based on a previously published protocol in Moluccan cockatoos 2 was performed 41

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The current pet ferret ( Mustela putorius furo ) population in the United States is estimated to be between 8 and 10 million. Hyperadrenocorticism in ferrets was first reported in 1987. Prevalence of the disease has been reported to range from 0

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism is a recognized endocrine disorder in dogs characterized by a chronic excess in circulating cortisol concentration. Approximately 85% of affected dogs have hyperadrenocorticism caused by a pituitary gland

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

adrenal gland neoplasms during ultrasonography. Several studies 4–7 have elicited the difficulties in distinguishing adrenal-dependent hyperadrenocorticism from PDH in situations of equivocal adrenal gland asymmetry. Therefore, there is a need for a new

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Hyperadrenocorticism is characterized by chronically elevated circulating concentrations of the steroid hormones produced by the adrenal cortex and is a common endocrine disorder in dogs. 1,2 Current treatments for dogs with PDH include a group

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism is a well-recognized endocrine disorder in dogs. It is estimated that approximately 85% of dogs with hyperadrenocorticism have PDH because of secondary bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia and that 15% have

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

CCK-deficient mice. 7 Both contraction and relaxation of the gallbladder are strongly correlated with plasma CCK concentration in humans, 8 and the diminished release of CCK contributes to gallstone formation in humans. 9 Hyperadrenocorticism is a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism is a well-recognized endocrine disorder in dogs. It is estimated that approximately 85% of dogs with hyperadrenocorticism have PDH and 15% have ATH as a result of a cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenoma

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Lipid metabolism was studied in 21 horses with hyperadrenocorticism. To be included in the study, horses had to have histologic evidence of a pars intermedia adenoma found at necropsy (n = 9), a baseline ACTH concentration greater than 400 pg/ml (n = 6), or a plasma cortisol concentration 2 hours after iv administration of 25 IU of acth greater than 413 nmol/Lin = 16).

Mean ± sd baseline plasma cortisol concentration was 338 ± 261 nmol/L (n = 20), mean ± sd plasma insulin concentration was 97 ± 54 μU/ml (n = 15), mean ± sd plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentration was 1.8 ± 1.2 mg/dl (n = 21), and mean ± sd plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration was 6.2 ± 6.4 mg/dl (n = 21). None of the horses had hyperlipemia.

Compared with clinically normal horses, horses with hyperadrenocorticism had increased lipolysis and increased ketogenesis. It was concluded that cortisol cannot be the sole factor contributing to insulin resistance in horses with hyperadrenocorticism.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association