Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 58 items for :

  • "histoplasmosis" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

in people have centered around the Missouri, Mississippi, and Ohio river valleys. 2 , 3 On the basis of available published case series, histoplasmosis appears to be the most prevalent systemic fungal infection in cats with the majority of reported

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/dL), hypoalbuminemia (2.1; RI, 2.2 to 4.0) and low creatinine (0.2 mg/dL; RI, 0.8 to 2.4 mg/dL). Suspecting progressive disseminated histoplasmosis, posaconazole 8 mg/kg, orally, once daily and prednisolone 1 mg/kg, orally, twice daily with instructions to taper to 1

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a typical multinucleated giant cell with intrahistiocytic H capsulatum yeasts. H&E stain; bar in main image = 265 μm; bar in inset = 60 μm. Discussion To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of histoplasmosis in an

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, eye, lymph nodes, skin, bone, oral cavity, and CNS. 1–10 Ingestion is another possible route of infection, given that experimental oral inoculation of dogs with the organism results in disseminated histoplasmosis, and this route might explain

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic, soil-borne fungus that is widely distributed throughout temperate and subtropical regions of the world. Histoplasmosis is the second most commonly reported invasive fungal infection of cats

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To examine use of corticosteroids in treating dogs with airway obstruction secondary to hilar lymphadenopathy caused by chronic histoplasmosis.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

16 dogs.

Procedure

Records for dogs with airway obstruction examined from January 1979 through December 1997 were reviewed. Dogs were included in the study if they had hilar lymphadenopathy documented radiographically and bronchoscopically, had serum antibodies against Histoplasma capsulatum, and did not have organisms in any cytologic or histologic samples. Dogs were assigned to groups on the basis of treatment given (5 dogs, corticosteroids only; 5 dogs, corticosteroids and antifungal medication; 6 dogs, antifungal medication only).

Results

Clinical signs resolved in < 1 week in dogs treated only with corticosteroids. In dogs treated with corticosteroids and an antifungal medication, improvement was evident in a mean of 2.6 weeks. In 5 of 6 dogs treated with only an antifungal medication, clinical signs resolved in a mean of 8.8 weeks. Dogs receiving corticosteroids did not develop active or disseminated histoplasmosis.

Clinical Implications

Corticosteroids can be used successfully in the treatment of dogs with hilar lymphadenopathy secondary to histoplasmosis. Affected dogs must be carefully evaluated for active infection. Specimens obtained by means of bronchoalveolar lavage, tracheal washing, or other methods should be examined to exclude the possibility of an active infection, which could result in corticosteroid-induced dissemination of disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214–1345-1348)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of 50 patients with histoplasmosis, therefore assisting in differentiation of blastomycosis and histoplasmosis in humans. 7 A recombinant antigen (rBAD-1) containing multiple repeats of the immunodominant 25-amino acid sequence from B dermatitidis

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were frequently located around small-caliber blood vessels at the borders of the mass. These findings were consistent with a histopathologic diagnosis of spinal cord histoplasmosis. Anaerobic microbial cultures of the excised material yielded no growth

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Tracheal wash and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analyses were performed in 9 dogs that had mycotic infections with pulmonary involvement. Characteristic organisms were identified in tracheal wash fluid in 3 of 7 dogs with blastomycosis. Organisms were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in 5 of 7 dogs with blastomycosis and in one dog with histoplasmosis. Organisms were not found in either fluid in one dog with coccidioidomycosis. These procedures should be considered for dogs with suspected mycotic infections that involve the lungs and that cannot be diagnosed by less invasive means.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lived indoors and outdoors. At the time of dental cleaning, findings on CBC and serum biochemical analysis were within reference range and serologic results for FeLV and FIV testing were negative. A diagnosis of histoplasmosis had been made for 2 cats in

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association