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samples to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. There are limited numbers of studies that have evaluated beef calf deaths unrelated to birthing or reproductive diseases by use of gross necropsy, histopathology, and laboratory tests. In 1 prospective study

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) for histopathology and CD3+/CD20+ immunohistochemistry study. Histopathologic evaluation followed guidelines of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Gastrointestinal Standardization Group (extended to full-thickness biopsy rather than

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

immunoreactivity (fPLI) was developed, validated, and performed at the Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. The sensitivity and specificity were established using histopathology as the gold standard and for a measure of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

appears as an oval, discolored bulge extending from the T7 to T9 vertebral bodies. Histopathology of the spinal cord revealed a poorly demarcated, unencapsulated, highly cellular centromedullary neoplastic mass with expansile growth that compressed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

morphology or identifying increased rubriphagocytic activity that indicates precursor-directed immune-mediated anemia (PIMA), which was suspected—although not confirmed—this case. Bone marrow histopathology provides a view of overall tissue architecture, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

CT findings correlated with the histopathology. Our hypotheses were that juvenile cats would have more severe CT lesions than adult cats, and that histological and CT severity would be correlated. Methods Case selection The medical record

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess gross and histologic tissue responses of skin incisions closed by use of absorbable subcuticular staples, cutaneous metal staples, and polyglactin 910 suture in pigs.

Animals—8 purpose-bred disease-free pigs.

Procedure—Pigs were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups from which tissues were collected after death on postoperative days (PODs) 7, 14, 21, or 42. In each pig, 4 incisions were made; 1 was closed subcuticularly with 3-0 polyglactin 910 suture, 1 was closed with metal staples, and 2 were closed with absorbable subcuticular staples. Incision sites were grossly evaluated every 3 days after closure. At necropsy, incision sites and surrounding tissues were examined histologically; a histopathologic scoring system was used to quantitate healing and tissue response directed against the closure material.

Results—Postoperatively, the metal staples induced a severe inflammatory response, compared with minimal inflammation associated with the suture or absorbable subcuticular staples. Histologic evaluation of incisions on PODs 7, 14, and 21 revealed less severe inflammation associated with absorbable subcuticular staples than that associated with the other materials.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that absorbable subcuticular staples induced a less severe inflammatory response in the early stages of healing in pigs, compared with other commonly used methods of wound closure. Use of absorbable staples potentially combines the benefits of subcuticular closure with the speed and precision of staple placement. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1975–1984)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

question was removed independent of the ovarian and uterine tissue and collected in a formalin jar to be sent for histopathology. Anesthesia and recovery were uneventful. Diagnostic Findings and Interpretation The initial histopathology report

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were continued as before. Because results for the incisional biopsy histopathology were inconclusive, 3 punch biopsies were collected under general isoflurane anesthesia 1 week later, and were again suggestive of reactive fibroplasia or a focal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, bile ducts, and caudal vena cava. A percutaneous liver biopsy was performed with samples submitted for both bacterial culture and sensitivity and histopathology. Blood was also submitted for bovine leukemia virus (BLV) serology due to the atypical cells

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association