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I njury to the suspensory ligament (SL) of horses can be a career-ending injury across a multitude of disciplines. 1 – 3 Injuries to the SL, both in the forelimbs and the hind limbs, are typically discussed with reference to 3 regions. These

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

each hind limb has also been used to measure static weight load distribution in dogs; in that investigation, bathroom scales were placed only under the hind limbs because placement under each limb, forelimbs included, was perceived in practice as

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

investigated the effect of forelimb lameness on pelvic movement asymmetry in a clinical population of equine patients. 1 However, hind limb compensatory lameness has not been extensively characterized in a substantial number of clinical patients, although it

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with a lameness abnormality, by observing the faults and anomalies in hind limb movements. Subtle signs of spinal ataxia, however, can be easily confused with mild musculoskeletal lameness. 1,3,4 Neurologic ataxia in horses is most commonly caused by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were the same for all measurements. The PFz and IFz were evaluated and expressed as a percentage of body weight. In the dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints, the limb with the lower GRF was considered the lame limb. The left hind limb in the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Patterns of joint angular excursions, net joint moments, and power of the hind limbs have been reported 1 for trotting Greyhounds and Labrador Retrievers, and it appears that there is some variability between breeds in these measures. In

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the curve) of vertical GRF, with less interest or emphasis on horizontal GRF. The vertical GRF pattern of a hind limb striking the force plate while a horse is trotting is much like a bell-shaped curve, with V max occurring near the middle of stance

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

differences in motion-time variables between limb pairs. 8 In a study 9 of horses walking over a force platform, ground reaction forces were approximately 90% symmetric between forelimb and hind limb pairs, and although there was some variation in this

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Thoroughbreds have a much higher percentage of type II muscle fiber than the percentage of type I muscle fiber, especially in hind limb and trunk muscles. 19 Therefore, those muscles should be less fatigue resistant. The objective of the present study was to

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Thirteen client-owned dogs referred to the university during the same period were deemed candidates for the study. Criteria for inclusion included diagnosis of naturally acquired hind limb problems (hip dysplasia with osteoarthritis or unilateral complete

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research