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An easy-to-use, point-of-care hematology analyzer should be a useful tool in a veterinary practice, particularly at practices that routinely administer chemotherapy to dogs and cats. A point-of-care hematology analyzer provides CBC results in a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

hematology analyzer a used in various laboratory settings classifies leukocytes on the basis of their size and MPO content by means of flow cytometry and peroxidase staining. 5 Peroxidase staining results from the formation of a dark precipitate at sites of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

measured from each individual for a total of 100 RBCs per species similar to previous sea turtle hematology studies. 11 , 12 RBC area was calculated according to the following formula as previously described as (maximum diameter X minimum diameter X π)/4

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare CBC results obtained by use of an in-house centrifugal analyzer with results of a reference method.

Design—Prospective study.

Sample Population—Blood samples from 147 dogs, 42 cats, and 60 horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital and from 24 cows in a commercial dairy herd.

Procedure—Results obtained with the centrifugal analyzer were compared with results obtained with an electrical-impedance light-scatter hematology analyzer and manual differential cell counting (reference method).

Results—The centrifugal analyzer yielded error messages for 50 of 273 (18%) samples. Error messages were most common for samples with values outside established reference ranges. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.80 to 0.99 for Hct, 0.55 to 0.90 for platelet count, 0.76 to 0.95 for total WBC count, and 0.63 (cattle) to 0.82 (cats) to 0.95 (dogs and horses) for granulocyte count. Coefficients for mononuclear cell (combined lymphocyte and monocyte) counts were 0.56, 0.65, 0.68, and 0.92 for cats, horses, dogs, and cattle, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that there was an excellent correlation between results of the centrifugal analyzer and results of the reference method only for Hct in feline, canine, and equine samples; WBC count in canine and equine samples; granulocyte count in canine and equine samples; and reticulocyte count in canine samples. However, an inability to identify abnormal cells, the high percentage of error messages, particularly for samples with abnormal WBC counts, and the wide confidence intervals precluded reliance on differential cell counts obtained with the centrifugal analyzer. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1195–1200)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

– 120 . 13. International Council for Standardization in Hematology. Expert Panel on Cytometry. Recommendations of the International Council for Standardization in Hematology for ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid anticoagulation of blood for blood cell

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare results of hematologic testing in nondiabetic and diabetic cats to identify possible indicators of alterations in long-term glucose control.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—117 client-owned cats (76 nondiabetic cats [25 with normal body condition, 27 overweight, and 24 obese] and 41 naïve [n = 21] and treated [20] diabetic cats).

Procedures—Signalment and medical history, including data on feeding practices, were collected. A body condition score was assigned, and feline body mass index was calculated. Complete blood counts and serum biochemical analyses, including determination of fructosamine, thyroxine, insulin, and proinsulin concentrations, were performed. Urine samples were obtained and analyzed.

Results—Glucose and fructosamine concentrations were significantly higher in the naïve and treated diabetic cats than in the nondiabetic cats. Insulin and proinsulin concentrations were highest in the obese cats but had great individual variation. Few other variables were significantly different among cat groups. Most cats, even when obese or diabetic, had unlimited access to food.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that cats at risk of developing diabetes (ie, overweight and obese cats) could not be distinguished from cats with a normal body condition on the basis of results of isolated hematologic testing. A longitudinal study is indicated to follow nondiabetic cats over a period of several years to identify those that eventually develop diabetes. Findings also suggested that dietary education of cat owners might be inadequate.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a direct assay to measure platelet surface-associated immunoglobulins (PSAIg) in dogs and to determine whether the assay is useful in the diagnosis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT).

Animals—20 healthy dogs were used to develop reference intervals, and 23 dogs with IMT and 17 with non-IMT were used to evaluate the clinical use of this assay.

Procedure—After optimization of platelet collection and assay conditions, concentrations of PSAIg were measured, using radiolabeled staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and polyclonal antibodies against canine IgG (anti-γ) and IgM (anti-µ). Concentrations of PSAIg were expressed as the percentage of radiolabeled immunoglobulin detector bound.

Results—Cut-off values (mean + 3 SD) were as follows: SpA, 1.1%; anti-γ, 1.3%; and anti-µ, 3.5%. Values greater than these cut-off values were considered positive. Values determined by use of radiolabeled SpA for all dogs with IMT were greater than the cut-off value; values were considered high positives (> 5 times cut-off value) for 22 of these 23 dogs. Although 9 of 17 dogs with non-IMT also had PSAIg concentrations greater than the cut-off value, values were considered high positives for only 3 of these 9 dogs.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The immunoradiometric assay developed is a reliable and sensitive method to detect PSAIg in dogs. However, to obtain accurate results, optimum temperature, time, and storage conditions must be used. Detection of increased concentrations of PSAIg in dogs presumed to have non-IMT should alert clinicians to reconsider an immune-mediated basis for the thrombocytopenia. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:124–136)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

diagnostic laboratories use automated methods. Reticulocytes can be enumerated automatically with large hematology analyzers that use flow cytometry, providing much more accurate, precise, and cost-effective results. 7,13 Automated reticulocyte counts

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association