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, Birhaneselassie M . The comparison between microhematocrit and automated methods for hematocrit determination . Int J Blood Res Disord . 2015 ; 2 ( 1 ): 225 – 230 . 34. Pearson TC , Guthrie DL . Trapped plasma in the microhematocrit . Am J Clin

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the contribution of hematocrit and RBC deformability to pulmonary vascular pressures of racehorses.

Design

Pony lungs were isolated and right and left lungs were perfused separately with blood. The effects of changing hematocrit and of pentoxifylline treatment were evaluated.

Animals

11 healthy mixed-breed ponies.

Procedure

Ponies were anesthesized, blood was collected, and lungs were removed and perfused with blood at constant flow rate.

Results

Increasing the hematocrit from 35% to 65% resulted in increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (53%, 45%), capillary shear stress (45%, 32%), and total vascular resistance (92%, 143%) at low (352 ± 33 ml/min) and high (1,442 ± 48 ml/min) flow rates, respectively. Pulmonary artery pressures were lower (10%, 11%) when lungs were perfused with blood from pentoxifylline-treated ponies, compared with blood from control ponies with low hematocrit (PCV, 30%) and low-flow rate and with high hematocrit (PCV, 45%) and high flow rate, respectively. Decreases in capillary shear stress and total vascular resistance were also observed for pentoxifylline-treated blood.

Conclusions

Increases in hematocrit equivalent to those occurring during competitive racing activity contribute substantially to pulmonary vascular pressures in horse lungs. Administration of pentoxifylline to ponies reduced RBC deformability and attenuated increases in pulmonary vascular pressures.

Clinical Relevance

Treatment of racehorses with pentoxifylline may reduce exercise-associated increases in pulmonary vacular pressure, thereby attenuating exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:346-350)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

results for the reference plasma glucose method was performed by use of commercially available software. h Results Hematocrit values between 9% and 67% were obtained. There was a significant effect of Hct on glucose concentration for both POC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-energy fish. Hematocrit values in fish are influenced by exhaustive exercise, capture, and stress. 21–25 Conversely, most elasmobranchs do not have the same dramatic and immediate response 15,25,26 unless they are subjected to substantial exhaustive

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mass —For 71 dogs, data obtained from citrated blood samples via TF-TEM were compared with Hct in EDTA-treated blood samples collected during the same venipuncture episode ( Figure 4 ). Hematocrit was significantly correlated with CT, CFT, α angle, and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-STAT system: a portable chemistry analyzer for the measurement of sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, glucose, and hematocrit . Clin Biochem 1995 ; 28 : 187 – 192 . 10.1016/0009-9120(95)90708-6

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the accuracy of 3 automated methods of determining Hct and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, compared with manual methods.

Animals

22 clinically normal adult horses of various breeds.

Procedure

A blood sample was obtained from each horse. Six dilutions (representing Hct of 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, or 70%) were prepared from each sample and analyzed, using 1 of 2 blood gas analyzers or a hemoximeter (for automated determinations) or the Wintrobe macrohematocrit and cyanmethemoglobin methods (for manual determinations). Regression analysis was used to determine mean slope relationships between Hct and Hb measurements obtained by use of manual versus automated methods. Slopes were compared, using Student's t-test.

Results

Of the 3 automated methods examined, only 1 blood gas analyzer reported Hct and Hb values that were not significantly different from those determined by use of manual methods; however, this analyzer could not report Hb concentrations below 2.5 g/dl. The other blood gas analyzer reported values for Hct and Hb concentrations that were consistently higher than those obtained by use of manual methods at Hct ≤ 20% and Hb ≤ 6.6 g/dl. The hemoximeter yielded more accurate results if the Hb concentration was between 6.6 and 20 g/dl.

Conclusion

Although there were some limitations in measuring at low Hb concentrations, the method of determining Hb concentration and Hct with blood gas analyzer 2 was more accurate than that with blood gas analyzer 1 (Hct and Hb concentration) or the hemoximeter (Hb only). (Am J Vet Res 1998; 59:1519-1522)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the agreement in measurements of Hct values and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentrations in blood samples from dogs and cats between a commercially available veterinary point-of-care (POC) Hct meter and a laboratory-based (LAB) analyzer and to determine the effects of various conditions (ie, lipemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hemolysis, autoagglutination, and reticulocytosis) on the accuracy of the POC meter.

SAMPLES

Blood samples from 86 dogs and 18 cats

PROCEDURES

Blood samples were run in duplicate on the POC meter, which reported Hgb concentration, measured via optical reflectance, and a calculated Hct value. The POC meter results were compared with results from a LAB analyzer. Blood samples with grossly visible lipemia, icterus, hemolysis, and autoagglutination were noted.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD values for LAB Hct were 33.9 ± 15.73% (range, 3.9% to 75.8%), and for LAB Hgb were 11.2 ± 5.4 g/dL (range, 1 to 24.6 g/dL). Mean bias between POC Hct and LAB Hct values was–1.8% with 95% limits of agreement (LOAs) of–11.1% to 7.5% and between POC Hgb and LAB Hgb concentrations was–0.5 g/dL with 95% LOAs of–3.8 to 2.8 g/dL. There was no influence of lipemia (14 samples), icterus (23), autoagglutination (14), hemolysis (12), or high reticulocyte count (15) on the accuracy of the POC meter. The POC meter was unable to read 13 blood samples; 9 had a LAB Hct ≤ 12%, and 4 had a LAB Hct concentration between 13% and 17%.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Overall, measurements from the POC meter had good agreement with those from the LAB analyzer. However, LOAs were fairly wide, indicating that there may be clinically important differences between measurements from the POC meter and LAB analyzer. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:49–55)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, variations due to breed have been observed; for example, small breed dogs such as Poodles have higher hematocrit reference intervals compared to large breed dogs. 3 Some of the disease conditions of newborn foals that can alter the hemogram include neonatal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, with a decrease averaging approximately 4 Hct percentage points and 30 X 10 9 /L, respectively. Although the full dose and 10-times dose PLN saw a decrease in hematocrit and platelet levels, it was not statistically different. Furthermore, the changes

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research