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and BNP, has been used clinically in dogs for the diagnosis of heart disease. 1,2 However, previous studies 6,7 in human patients and experimental studies 8,9 of heart disease in dogs have reported differential regulation of secretory mechanisms for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Left-sided CHF is a syndrome characterized in dogs by development of pulmonary venous congestion and edema or pleural effusion secondary to severe left heart disease. 1 Clinical signs of L-CHF in dogs include dyspnea or varying degrees of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of heart disease. 4 , 13 , 14 In a murine model, significant myocardial fibrosis was observed after galectin-3 was infused into the pericardial sac of healthy rats. 4 Compared to controls, dogs that developed heart failure after aortic banding

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Chronic valvular heart disease, characterized by progressive myxomatous degeneration and thickening of the mitral valve leaflets, is the most common heart disease in dogs. 1 This disease is particularly common in CKCSs, with echocardiographic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

advanced heart disease are perceived to have a reduced quality of life because of respiratory distress, poor appetite, and reduced activity. 3 Most causes of heart disease in dogs, such as mitral valve disease and cardiomyopathy, are progressive and reduce

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Giacomazzi, and Eva Oxford for reviewing the manuscript prior to submission. ABBREVIATIONS AVB Atrioventricular block CHD Congenital heart disease CI Confidence interval CIMD Chronic infectious myocardial disease DCM Dilated cardiomyopathy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Platelet function, antithrombin and plasminogen activities, and fibrinolytic capabilities in 11 cats with acquired heart disease were compared with results in 4 healthy cats. Of 11 cats with heart disease, 9 had hyperthyroidism with secondary cardiac dysfunction. One cat with hyperthyroidism had renal disease and heart failure, and of 2 cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 1 also had renal disease. At the time of testing, 3 cats had thromboembolic events associated with the disease. Compared with healthy cats, cats with acquired heart disease had increased activity of antithrombin III, a protein that behaves as an acute-phase reactant. Plasminogen activity was decreased, although not significantly, in cats with acquired heart disease, compared with results in healthy cats. In cats with left ventricular dysfunction, clot retraction was decreased (marginal significance, P = 0.058) and might be attributed, in some cases, to the medications received by the cats. Dilute whole blood clots from all cats failed to lyse in vitro. This observation, at present, lacks adequate explanation. Platelets from cats with acquired heart disease, compared with platelets from healthy cats, had decreased responsiveness (aggregation and [14C]serotonin release) to adenosine diphosphate and increased responsiveness to collagen. Hyperthyroid cats were receiving various drugs (propranolol, atenolol, or diltiazem) to empirically treat clinical signs of disease attributable to cardiac dysfunction. Although numbers of cats in each group were small, definite trends were observed in the results of tests. Platelets from cats receiving atenolol had decreased responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate and unaltered responsiveness to collagen, compared with platelets from healthy cats, and may have decreased risk of thrombus formation. Cats receiving propranolol and diltiazem had platelets with markedly increased responsiveness to collagen; however, these drugs appeared to provide sufficient cardioprotective benefits to counter the prothrombotic effects.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether attenuated wavy fibers may be found in the myocardium of Newfoundlands without clinical or echocardiographic evidence of heart disease.

Animals—15 Newfoundlands from a kennel with a known predisposition to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 32 dogs of other breeds that died suddenly or were euthanatized for reasons unrelated to heart disease and did not have gross postmortem evidence of heart disease.

Procedure—Echocardiography was performed on all Newfoundlands on a yearly basis. Necropsy specimens from all dogs were evaluated for attenuated wavy fibers (ie, myocardial cells < 6 µm in diameter with a wavy appearance).

Results—None of the Newfoundlands had clinical signs of heart disease, and results of echocardiographic examinations were within reference ranges. Seven Newfoundlands had histologic evidence of attenuated wavy fibers, whereas attenuated wavy fibers were not found in the remaining 8 Newfoundlands or in any of the 32 dogs of other breeds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggest that attenuated wavy fibers in dogs with a known predisposition for DCM may indicate an early stage of the disease. However, further studies on a larger number of dogs are needed to confirm this hypothesis. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:238-241)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

wedge pressure (an indirect measurement of left atrial pressure) 10,11 and are increased in humans, dogs, and cats with various cardiac disorders, relative to concentrations in those without heart disease. 10,12–21 In humans, C-BNP measurement is more

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluations were considered normal. For the HF groups, we selected 30 client-owned dogs with heart disease. The DMVD group comprised 15 dogs (6 females and 9 males; 10 small breed, 4 medium breed, and 1 large breed) with DMVD. Mean ± SD age of the dogs with

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research