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, with a concomitant rise in gun violence across major US cities. 1 – 3 Numerous human trauma centers reported an increased number of individuals presenting with gunshot wounds after the start of the pandemic in comparison to prior years. 4 – 7 Although

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the same overnight poaching incident, a second rhinoceros in the enclosure was killed by gunshot, and it was found with its horns removed. The morning following the poaching incident, the surviving rhinoceros was examined. Observing the animal from

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mandibular body. Nine weeks earlier, the dog sustained gunshot trauma to the right mandible, right maxilla, and musculature of the left shoulder from 2 bullets fired from a 9-mm handgun. Severe comminution and contamination of the right mandible were treated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Gunshot injuries represent a small subset of traumatic injuries in veterinary patients, compared with other causes of trauma, and are potentially devastating. 1 Previous surveys of urban patient populations have demonstrated that most trauma is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine history, signalment, physical examination findings, treatment, complications, outcome, and prognostic indicators of dogs and cats treated for gunshot wounds at an urban veterinary referral hospital.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

82 dogs and 2 cats.

Results

Young (< 3 years old) sexually intact males were overrepresented. Of the 122 injuries, 52 were to limbs (23/52 were associated with fractures), 32 involved the thorax, 14 involved the abdomen, 14 involved the head, 6 involved the neck, and 4 involved the vertebral column. Seven animals were euthanatized because of financial concerns. Of the remaining 77, 11 died and 66 were discharged from the hospital.

Conservative treatment was adequate for animals with limb injuries not associated with a fracture. However, animals with evidence of peritoneal penetration required an exploratory laparotomy. Animals with thoracic injuries usually could be managed with conservative treatment or thoracocentesis. Only 1 animal underwent thoracotomy. Wound infection developed in 4 animals. Initial treatment of animals with gunshot wounds should include administration of antibiotics effective against gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

Clinical Implications

Most dogs with gunshot wounds that receive adequate treatment can be expected to survive. However, dogs with vertebral column or abdominal wounds may have a worse prognosis than dogs with thoracic or limb injuries. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:658–662

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 20 dogs with gunshot fractures were reviewed to determine the prevalence of preoperative contamination and postoperative osteomyelitis. Fractures were repaired primarily by application of a bone plate (n = 16) or external fixator (n = 2) in buttress fashion or application of interfragmentary screws and pins (n = 2). In 17 dogs, an autogenous bone graft was also used. Results of bacteriologic culture of swab specimens obtained intraoperatively for 15 of the 16 dogs that received antimicrobials preoperatively and for all 4 dogs that did not receive antimicrobials preoperatively were negative. Three dogs developed osteomyelitis at 6, 8, and 10 weeks following surgery; for all 3, results of bacteriologic culture of specimens obtained intraoperatively had been negative. Fracture healing was uncomplicated in the remaining dogs (mean follow-up time, 23 months; range, 2 to 58 months). Despite the potential for contamination associated with gunshot trauma, results indicated a low prevalence of preoperative fracture contamination and postoperative osteomyelitis. These results imply either a low contamination rate or treatable contamination of the perifracture area.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-scale disease outbreaks and natural disasters, necessitate a need for an economically feasible method for mass euthanasia. According to the AVMA Guidelines for Animal Euthanasia 2020 edition, 7 euthanasia by gunshot is an acceptable method when certain

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Twenty-two horses were examined because of firearm injuries. Nine had been shot with .22- caliber bullets, 2 with BB pellets, 6 with buckshot, 1 with a, 35-caliber bullet, and 1 with an airgun pellet. Injury was confined to the skin or skeletal muscles in 8 horses. Of these, 7 returned to their previous use. In 14 horses, injuries to additional structures were incurred, including the sinus and pharynx (n = 2), mandible (n = 1), tooth (n = 1), aorta (n = 1), eye (n = 3), tibia (n = 1), gastrointestinal tract (n = 3), joint (n = 1), and trachea (n = 1). The 3 horses that had only eye injuries were discharged to their owners. Of the other 11 horses with injuries to deep/vital structures, 3 died, 5 were euthanatized, and 3 survived.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were also included in this category. Reports where findings included physical injuries such as BFT, gunshot wounds, burns, sharp-force trauma, or evidence of drowning, asphyxiation, or suspicious intoxications were included as potential cases of NAI

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association