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effect of the sample collection method on FOBT results in cats or dogs. Guaiac FOBT is currently the main test type available in veterinary medicine for assessment of fecal occult blood. Guaiac FOBT works by using gum guaiac-impregnated paper that is

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

available kit h that included the tetramethylbenzidine and guaiac methods was used in the present study. Analysis was performed and graded according the manufacturer's instructions. In the grading scale, grade 0 indicated negative results for fecal occult

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of 2 commercial test kits for detection of occult blood in canine feces, various volumes of blood were administered to 6 dogs via orogastric tube. Blood volumes tested were chosen on the basis of hemoglobin quantities of 5, 10, 20, 200, 350, and 500 mg of hemoglobin/kg of body weight. Fecal specimens were collected twice daily and analyzed separately by 2 observers for the presence of occult blood by use of modified guaiac and orthotolodine tablet tests, and for melena by visual inspection. Five dogs given blood at the rate of 500 mg of hemoglobin/kg and 1 dog given blood at the rate of 350 mg of hemoglobin/kg developed melena. Results of both occult blood tests were positive in 2 of 6 dogs given blood at the rate of 5 mg of hemoglobin/kg. Five of 6, and 4 of 6 dogs given blood at the rate of 10 mg hemoglobin/kg had positive test results by modified guaiac and orthotolodine methods, respectively. Results of both methods were positive in all dogs given blood at the rate of 20 mg of hemoglobin/kg. There was 86% agreement between the 2 observers’ results for the modified guaiac method, and 78% agreement for the orthotolodine method. There was 77% agreement of results between the 2 test methods. Gastrointestinal transit time decreased with increasing volumes of blood. Occult blood testing was found to be useful for detection of blood in feces at volumes 20 to 50 times less than that required to cause melena.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

To evaluate the effect of diet on results obtained by use of 2 commercial test kits for detection of occult blood in feces, 5 dogs were fed 7 diets in randomized sequence. Dry and canned diets with various principal ingredients were evaluated. Each diet was offered twice over a 24-hour period, followed by a 36-hour nonfeeding period. Fecal specimens were collected twice daily, and tests for occult blood were performed within 12 hours. The dietary origin of fecal specimens was confirmed by use of colored markers fed with each diet, and was correlated with estimates of gastrointestinal tract transit time. A modified guaiac paper test and an o-tolidine tablet test were performed on each specimen.

Of 59 specimens, 4 were positive for occult blood, using the o-tolidine tablet test. Three positive results were associated with a mutton-based canned diet, and 1 positive result was associated with a canned beef-based diet. Of 59 specimens, 11 were positive for occult blood, using the modified guaiac paper test. Four positive results were associated with the mutton diet, and 3 positive results were associated with the beef diet. Of the remaining 5 diets, 4 caused 1 positive reaction.

Results were inconsistent with the null hypothesis that the distribution of positive occult blood test results is not affected by diet (P < 0.025), and indicate that diet can affect the specificity of peroxidase-based tests for detection of occult blood in canine feces. Diet modification prior to testing is recommended.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-derived porphyrins by use of spectrophotometry, 2,3 and species-specific immunochemical assays. 4–6 In addition, colorless chromogens that become colored when oxidized (eg, guaiac and tetramethylbenzidine) have long been used in tests that make use of the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

using a guaiac paper test (Hemoccult; Beckman Coulter). An applicator stick was used to sample the feces in 2 different sites prior to applying to the guaiac slide. The tests were developed between 3 and 14 days after sample collection as recommended by

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association