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Introduction Monitoring of blood glucose concentrations is extremely important in veterinary medicine. 1 – 3 The accurate and rapid measurement of blood glucose concentrations is not only important for the treatment of patients with diabetes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Portable blood glucose meters are commonly used to measure venous and capillary blood glucose concentrations in dogs and cats. 1–5 However, results obtained with various PBGMs can differ among themselves and from results of chemistry analyzers

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, or stillbirths of previously viable fetuses. 5 Initial diagnostic tests routinely recommended for dogs presented with possible dystocia include assessment of blood glucose and ionized calcium levels as well as abdominal imaging. Hypoglycemia and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Evaluation of blood glucose is a vital component of the diagnostic evaluation of various disease processes, such as inflammatory and infiltrative bowel diseases 1 and insulin dysregulation associated with equine metabolic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Obese cats are at higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Even severely obese cats have fasting blood glucose concentrations within the reference range, but they have evidence of glucose intolerance when challenged with glucose during an IV

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Veterinary-specific PBGMs are commonly used to monitor systemic blood glucose concentrations of dogs and cats in veterinary hospitals and other settings. 1–4 These devices are particularly useful when frequent measurements are required because

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Glucose abnormalities (dysglycemia) are reported in dogs and cats with a variety of illnesses. 1 While either high or low blood glucose can cause serious complications, hypoglycemia is more life-threatening in the short term

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Hypoglycemia in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) is often secondary to a pancreatic islet β-cell tumor, commonly termed insulinoma. A blood glucose concentration < 70 mg/dL is strongly suggestive of insulinoma, which reportedly comprises

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Accurate and efficient assessment of an animal's blood glucose concentration aids clinical management of many pathological conditions that cause hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, including diabetes mellitus. Most clinicians have access to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In human and small animal medicine, hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are common hematologic abnormalities. Treatment for either condition requires serial measurements of blood glucose concentrations with near instantaneous results. Therefore, POC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research