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short- and long-term consequences of targeting cellular components expressing target self-antigens. As advances continue to be made in the availability of canine reagents, genetic engineering strategies, and recognition of companion dogs with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, simple, effective, time-saving, and cost-effective than would have been evaluation of the vaccine in swine. Acknowledgments Funded by the State Key Laboratory of Animal Genetic Engineering Vaccines, Yebio Bioengineering Co Ltd, Qingdao, China

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency in Thailand previously tested a subset of samples from the same animals in February 2018 using the IGRA-BioTech-v1 developed by their Industrial

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate an alternative treatment for bovine mastitis by using Pm11 antimicrobial peptide.

SAMPLE

5 bovine mastitis pathogens that were previously isolated from cows affected by either clinical or subclinical mastitis.

PROCEDURES

The current study introduces Pm11 antimicrobial peptide as an alternative treatment for bovine mastitis. The antibacterial activity of Pm11 was tested against Escherichia coli strain SCM1249, Klebsiella spp strain SCM1282, Staphylococcus aureus strain CM967, Streptococcus agalactiae strain SCM1084, and Streptococcus uberis strain SCM1310 using minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) and time-kill kinetics. The pathogens’ morphological changes were demonstrated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cytotoxicity of Pm11 was assessed using the minimum hemolytic concentration assay.

RESULTS

MBCs ranged from 2.5 to 10 μM and IC50 ranged from 0.32 to 2.07 μM. Time-kill kinetics at MBC demonstrated that Pm11 reduced viable cell counts of S agalactiae strain SCM1084 and S uberis strain SCM1310 from 105 to 0 CFU/mL within 1 h. E coli strain SCM1249 and S aureus strain CM967 were reduced from 105 to 0 CFU/mL within 4 h. The average Pm11-induced hemolytic activity was < 10% for all Pm11 concentrations tested except at the maximum concentration tested (160 μM: 10.19 ± 2.29%). Based on SEM, Pm11 induced morphological and cellular changes in S aureus and E coli.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Pm11 antimicrobial peptide demonstrated in vitro antibacterial activity against the common bovine mastitis pathogens E coli, S aureus, S agalactiae, and S uberis, except Klebsiella spp, and should be further investigated in vivo.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

understand complex mechanisms underlying gene-environment interactions in the etiopathogenesis of chronic neurologic diseases. This includes the development of early-stage biomarkers that rely on minimally invasive biopsies. In addition, genetic engineering

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

against several strains of the H5N1 virus. A team from the University of Pittsburgh, CDC, and USDA published a study in the Feb. 15 Journal of Virology about a vaccine that protects mice and chickens. The researchers developed the vaccines by genetically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

in Medicine in 2007. Those researchers were responsible for the development of embryonic stem cells from laboratory mice and for subsequent advances in genome manipulation that resulted in genetically engineered mice and ultimately promoted genetic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

gene, STa mutant gene, and LT B gene were amplified from the E coli C83902 plasmid to construct K88ac-3 STa -LT B fusion gene using genetic engineering technology. Its immunogenicity was then studied, and a trivalent genetically engineered

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-market food safety monitoring for certain farm animals modified or developed using genetic engineering that are intended for human food,” a USDA announcement states. The FDA would retain authority over genomic alterations for nonagricultural purposes and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Medical Institute reported genetically engineering a prion-deficient goat fetus. Other studies have focused on the disruption of prion production in mice, a species that does not naturally contract prion diseases. Global News Diseases on the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research